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Required PTO around the holidays for only the Sales Team California

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  • Required PTO around the holidays for only the Sales Team California

    I am a new employee, and my company is forcing the entire sales team to take 5 PTO days over the holidays. (the rest of the company will be open, business as usual) They said we can go 'negitive PTO' if we need to.
    I would personally rather work the days and take my time off at another time. My office is in California, Corporate Headquarters are in NY. I have exempt status. Does anyone know of any laws on this matter?

  • #2
    There are none. Sorry, but if you are looking for a law that will force the employer to allow you to work and/or take your PTO at another time, no such law exists in any state.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      It's legal.
      See Question #6 here:
      http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_Vacation.htm
      I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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      • #4
        Even if there is nothing about it in the employee handbook? I kind of feel like I got bait & switched. My offer letter said that I get 17 PTO days, but I only get to choose when to use 12 of them. Nothing on this?
        I'm grateful for my job, but disappointed nothing was mentioned when they were bragging to me about my great PTO package.

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        • #5
          You can take your offer letter to a local attorney for review, but we are now talking "contract law", not labor law, and offer letters historically almost never rise to the level of an enforcable contract. And any contract law answer always starts with "take all documents to a local contract attorney for review".
          "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
          Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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          • #6
            There doesn't have to be anything in the employee handbook about it. The employee handbook is not a law, and in order to contain every possible condition or situation that might possibly occur, they'd need to issue you a backhoe to lift that handbook.

            If the law does not specifically say that it's illegal, it's legal.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

            Comment

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