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  • CA Based Company California

    Hello:

    I am a bit rusty on this since I never had to really apply it during my HR career, but correct me if I am wrong.

    I work for a company that is based in CA, it has now began to expand its function to many other states within the U.S. The number of employees for each of those outside states is no greater than 3 per state. We have been applying CA employment laws when dealing with employee relations, such as Leaves of Absences, however, is this something we should continue to do? Or should we being to consider the other states own employment laws? Are there any specific states in the U.S. that require outside businesses to apply their state laws vs. CA's? The reason I am asking is because we will experience another growth spurt in a few months and will go into other states. The states we currently operate in are CO, NV, IN, ME, NH, VA, KY, GA, and MO.

    I remember there is a rule of thumb that says if the main headquarters is 75 miles or more away from its other facilities, then we apply the law of the state in which the main headquarters is located and not obligated to use any other jurisdictions/states rules or regulations? Is that correct? Please advise. Thanks.
    Last edited by jpalacios25; 02-11-2010, 10:48 AM.

  • #2
    Seeing as how California arguably has the most employee-friendly wage and hour laws in the state, this is going to cost your a LOT of money in the long run. I suggest you invest in one of the paid subscription services for both payroll and HR, such as CCH, BNA, RIA and do some research.

    I've been in payroll and wage and hour compliance for many years and I've never heard of such a "rule". I think someone was pulling your leg.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Agreed with Patty. All states would have to agree on such a rule, and all 50 states never agree on anything labor law related. That sounds like some rule some employer made up. It also sounds a lot like parts of the FMLA rules, which apply to nothing but FMLA.
      "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
      Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DAW View Post
        Agreed with Patty. All states would have to agree on such a rule, and all 50 states never agree on anything labor law related. That sounds like some rule some employer made up. It also sounds a lot like parts of the FMLA rules, which apply to nothing but FMLA.
        Too true! The 50 states can barely agree on the fact that there are 50 states!
        Not everything in America is actionable in a court of law. Please remember that attorneys are in business for profit, and they get paid regardless of whether or not you win or lose.

        I offer my knowledge and experience at no charge, I admit that I am NOT infallible, I am wrong sometimes, hopefully another responder will correct me if that is the case with the answer above, regardless, it is your responsibility to verify any and all information provided.

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