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california salaries and time tracking California

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  • california salaries and time tracking California

    I am on salary. i do my 8 hour days. is it legal for your employer to write down your hours of work (for example time you get into work and time you leave) please advice.

  • #2
    Yes. "Salaried" is just a payment method.
    - Employers are required to record time worked for all Non-Exempt employees, whether those employees are paid on a hourly or salaried basis.
    - Employers are allowed (but not required) to record time worked for all Exempt employees, whether those employees are paid on a hourly or salaried basis.
    Last edited by DAW; 08-25-2007, 06:52 AM.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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    • #3
      DAW, don't you mean, allowed for exempt employees?
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        I mean exempt

        does that applied to exempt employees? thats what i mean..sorry

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        • #5
          DAW meant that recording time for exempt employees is not prohibited by law. Employers may do it if they wish.
          Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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          • #6
            And it does not affect the exemption if the employer does so unless the exempt employee's pay is affected by it. There can be a number of perfectly valid reasons for keeping track of an exempt employee's time.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cbg View Post
              DAW, don't you mean, allowed for exempt employees?

              Yes, good catch. I have corrected the orginal post.
              "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
              Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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              • #8
                Thank you much

                DAW thanks for your help.

                another question within that, the employer docks my pay the last time i call in because i got into a car accident. is that legal?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by datsdbomb View Post
                  DAW thanks for your help.

                  another question within that, the employer docks my pay the last time i call in because i got into a car accident. is that legal?
                  Are you exempt or non-exempt? If you're not sure what that means, what, EXACTLY, do you do for a living?
                  Please no private messages about your situation.

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                  • #10
                    Per post #4 you indicate you meant exempt - are you positive you are exempt? As moburkes asked, what do you do for a living - what is your job title & what are your duties?

                    How long were you off due to the car accident - (ie part of a day, a whole day)?

                    Thanks.
                    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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                    • #11
                      And, was this car accident on your personal time or on business time?
                      I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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                      • #12
                        accident

                        I am exempt employee - Manager. Got an accident on the way to work. only took off a day and my salary was deducted for that day i was out.

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                        • #13
                          Okay, next question.

                          Does your employer offer a paid sick time benefits and if so, how many days? It makes a difference to whether you can legally be docked for taking time off due to illness/injury.

                          It IS legal to dock even an exempt employee who takes a whole day off for personal reasons, but there are limits on it if that reason is illness/injury.
                          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                          • #14
                            sick time

                            the employer does not offer sick time for their hourly as well as for their salary employees

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                            • #15
                              If the employer does not offer a reasonable number of paid sick days, then they may not dock an EXEMPT employee for missing time due to illness or injury. (Non-exempt employees, with very few, state specific exceptions that do not apply here, never have any legal expectation of being paid when they do not work, regardless of the reason.)

                              It IS legal to dock an exempt employee, in full day increments ONLY (unless FMLA applies) for missing time due to personal reasons that are not related to illness or injury, regardless of what paid leave is or is not offered.
                              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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