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CA-Is OFFERING a break enough? or employees must take net 10 per 4?

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  • CA-Is OFFERING a break enough? or employees must take net 10 per 4?

    I'm a security manager who's concerned about what I have to do to be in compliance with the labor law regarding breaks.
    If I simply letting my security officers know that they can take up to net 10 minutes breaks every four hours enough? Or do they have to actually take them. My difficulty is I need to hire a person just to cover my 6 officers' breaks, because we're talking about an hour of spots to fill every four hours, and two hours every full eight-hour shift.
    I'm just trying to get-by by relieving them when needed UP TO net ten minutes, not to the fullest, everytime. This way, they can get their breaks when they want (a few minutes here and there, rather than all gone for full ten minutes each) without hiring someone just to cover spots that become vacant as a result of breaks.

    Thank you very much!
    Last edited by managersupervisor; 04-24-2006, 04:10 PM.

  • #2
    We just went through this in great detail on another thread.

    According to my source, in CA the MEAL break can be waived IF the total shift is less than six hours AND both employer and employee agree.

    I do not see any circumstances in which the employee can choose to waive the rest breaks.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. Could you provide the thread that you were mentioning? Thank you.

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      • #4
        http://www.laborlawtalk.com/showthread.php?t=89668

        http://www.laborlawtalk.com/showthread.php?t=89681

        Keep in mind that the poster from these threads is not in your state.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment

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