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Protection For the Salaried

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  • Protection For the Salaried

    I have read the exemptions and I do qualify (just barely) under exempt status.
    I am a (low) salaried manager in Iowa, and I have been required to work between 70 and 80 hours per week for about 9 months now.
    It sounds like there is absolutely NO overtime consideration in a case like this?
    Also, is there protection at all from abuse for salaried managers? I.e. can a company REQUIRE that you work 70 hours a week? I know that I was scheduled for 12 hour shifts 6 days a week by my boss. Could I refuse to work these long hours?
    One last thing, though I get paid hourly, when I checked my paycheck this last time I noticed it had an hourly calculation on it stating I had worked only 66 hours in 15 days instead of the 160 I likely worked. Though my pay came out to (roughly) the same. Looking back I have been seeing that I was "put down" for between 65 and 70 hours for every paycheck going back (paychecks are bi-monthly) or every other week-ish. Can this be right, and is it allowable for the company to record it in as such?

    Thank you so much for your help!

  • #2
    If you are paid hourly, I can say almost positively that they are treating you as a nonexempt employee. Exempt employees must be paid a guaranteed salary of at least $455 per week (with limited exceptions) or they aren't exempt, even though the job duties may qualify.

    Having said that, exempt employees must be paid their full salary (again, with limited exceptions) for any workweek in which they perform any work; nonexempt employees need only be paid for the actual time worked. That is the primary difference. All employees are expected to work the hours necessary to do their job to the satisfaction of the employer. The difference is whether overtime must be paid.

    Iowa law does not require the hours worked appear on the pay stub at all.

    Just to make sure you aren't in one of the classifications in which you could be paid hourly, even though your job duties may qualify your position as exempt, what exactly do you do?
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Also, just to make sure your question is answered; an employee who is correctly classified as exempt does not EVER have to be paid overtime no matter how many hours they work. If they are correctly classified as exempt, even if they work 168 hours in the week they do not need to be paid anything whatsoever over their regular salary.

      70 hours a week is a lot, but a great many exempt employees work that many hours a week as a matter of course.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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