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  • "at will"

    Could someone explain what an "at will" hire is?

  • #2
    I am sorry about this. I meant to add this link to it.


    http://www.ppspublishers.com/article..._terminate.htm

    If intersested this is an excerpt. Of what at will is. Go to the link for more infofrom above. Meant to addd it earlier thought I did but I was ina rush. I was almost late at work.


    Most employers are familiar with the “at-will” concept that, simply put, allows employers to terminate employees at any time, for any legal reason, or for no reason at all. The courts generally have upheld the right to terminate at will, but this right does not mean that employers should blithely terminate without giving a reason or without following normal policies and procedures. In fact, if you try to fire an employee by invoking the at-will clause, you could find yourself defending against a discrimination or wrongful termination claim. This possibility does not mean that the at-will clause is useless. The real reason most lawyers recommend including an at-will clause in personnel policies is to give the employer flexibility in applying its policies so that they will not become rigid contractual obligations that must be followed uniformly. Therefore, to help avoid discrimination claims, you should first follow your discipline and termination procedures, whenever possible. Your at-will clause should really only be thought of as a legal defense to keep you from being forced to follow your policies arbitrarily.
    Last edited by reddraco; 03-13-2006, 09:39 AM. Reason: Need to add excerpt.

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    • #3
      reddraco, can you tell me where you obtained that paragraph?
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        My question too, cbg.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          Truly sorry

          WEll I am sorry about that for the post above. I didnt mean to get all of you mad at me. I thought I had the link on it until I got back on here and everyone was like where doid you get your info? I will double check next time.
          Well guess I will just ask the questions than. I was just tryin to help. Ill leave it up to the gurus around here.

          Talk to ya later
          Draco,
          Sorry again
          Last edited by reddraco; 03-13-2006, 09:43 AM. Reason: appolo

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          • #6
            The reason we asked was that is not what "at-will" employment is at all. All employees are "at-will" automatically (except for Montana and there, only under certain circumstances) and that can only be overridden by a bona fide employment contract. "At-will" only means that the employee can quit the job at any time for any reason, and the employer can fire the employee at any time for any reason that is not a violation of law. Everything else in that paragraph is a stretch and reflects only the writer's opinion. It is not the law.
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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            • #7
              In addition, I'm concerned about possibly copyright violations since you posted it without providing credit to the site where it came from.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                it is:

                means you can be fired for any reason, no reason, a wrong reason, just not an illegal reason.

                you are employed at the will of your boss. Or some might say, you are employed at your will, to keep working. You work, you get paid at least minimum wage. Everything else is just icing on the measly cake. Vacation, not required. sick days, not required. pleasant atmosphere, not required. you don't like it, get a job elsewhere.

                of course, most places offer these "extras" since otherwise they wouldn't be able to attract many workers, but they still exist, and this is the subject of an economic theory on what is given to entice employees.

                curt j.

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