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  • Told not to come in.

    Hi, I work in California, and the assistant manager at my work just left me a voicemail telling me not to come in for work tomorrow. I was scheduled to work a 3.5 hour shift. I'm a full-time employee and I need my hours.

    I was told that if you're sent home early, before half of your shift is completed, they're obligated to pay you for half of your shift to a maximum of 4 hours.

    I'm sort of confused about this one because they called me the night before to tell me that they don't need me to come to work. Do they need to pay me my minimum 2 hours?

  • #2
    No, they do not. The reporting time pay is intended to compensate you for actually going through the trouble of showing up. Since they gave you notice, you didn't "report".
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Guarantee of hours

      Please tell me...I am a nurse that is one of many whose hours get cut due to low census. The hospital then uses PTO to compensate for the lost hours unless you tell them not to. My question is...I was under the impression that I signed on to work for a certain number of hours per pay period and I pretty much guaranteed I would stick up to my end of the deal. Does any company have the right to dock your hours and to what extent???
      Last edited by rnheaven17; 01-31-2006, 10:58 AM.

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      • #4
        Unless you have a bona fide contract that guarantees you x number of hours per week, your employer is free to change your schedule at his convenience to as many or as few hours as he wants you to work.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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