Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Forced to make up time

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Forced to make up time

    This doesn't affect me, but it does affect several of my co-workers.

    We are all exempt employees. We carry a pager and are on call at least 1 week per month. When we get paged, we can usually fix the problem remotely, but sometimes have to come to the workplace to fix it. If we repair it remotely we are prohibited from adding that to our timesheet.

    If certain employees are late on occasion, or have to leave early, they are told that the time needs made up. This does not seem to be a blanket rule.

    My questions are... If we are exempt, are we required to make up the time missed for partial day absences? What can the employer leagally do to that employee?

    What employers don't seem to understand is that most of their exempt employees will probably work over 2080 hours per year.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by mkozusnik; 01-26-2006, 08:36 AM.

  • #2
    What many exempt employees don't seem to realize is that they are not paid on a basis of 2080 hours per year. They are paid on the basis of getting their job done. If it takes more than 40 hours a week to complete their job, then that's what it takes. Their salary covers all hours worked, regardless of whether it is 20 hours a week or 80 hours a week.

    Any employee, exempt or non-exempt, is responsible for working the hours they are told to work. Yes, an exempt employee can be required to make up time and they can be fired if they do not comply.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment

    The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
    Working...
    X