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Employment Verification

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  • Employment Verification

    Based in CA

    Can I ask my ex-employer for a Referral document verifying my Employment with them? Eg: Legnth of time worked etc....

    If I made the request, does the employer have to give me this or can they refuse? I recently worked for a staffing firm for 5 weeks - who gave me tough time collecting my wages. Since they refused to pay me per payperiod, I finally quit and I filed a wage claim with DLSE...

    Obviosuly - I am not on best terms with this company.
    But still have to accept the sorry fact that they were my last employer...

    I want to get a referral letter to verify my employment with them ... what can I do? Thanks.
    Any advice how I should word my request and what I can ask for?

  • #2
    Can I ask my ex-employer for a Referral document verifying my Employment with them? Eg: Legnth of time worked etc....

    Yes, you may ask. Nothing in the law prohibits you from asking.

    If I made the request, does the employer have to give me this or can they refuse?

    Unless the employer is a public utility they may refuse. In your state, ONLY public utilities are required by law to give service letters upon request.

    You didn't ask this but for your own information and possibly peace of mind: As an employer, I do not ask for, and pay very little attention to, referral letters. For one thing (and this is NOT an accusation) they are too easily forged. Anyone with a scanner and a laser printer can come up with a set of glowing references from companies that have never heard of them. For another, I may have questions I want to ask that are not answered in the letter. I don't want to see a letter or a document; I want the name and phone number of someone I can have a conversation with. I would disregard any written references I was given on prospective employees unless they had a legitimate, and verifiable, reason why it was impossible to talk with the employer. I'd probably accept deployment to the Middle East for a year's tour of duty in the armed forces as a legitimate reason why I couldn't talk with a previous employer. I can't think of much else, short of death.

    So rather than ask for a referral letter that will most likely be ignored, I would suggest you come up with someone, maybe at the client you worked for rather than the staffing agency, who would be willing to take phone calls on your behalf.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thankyou for your detailed advice.
      I agree that phone references are best.

      I have actually provided the prospective employer with client references and the client was more than happy to put in a good word.
      I was just wondering what to do if they insist on having something direct from the staffing firm too.
      Anyway, hopefully it will all turn out fine.
      Thanks.

      Comment

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