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Checking References of Current Employer

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  • Checking References of Current Employer

    This may be more of a Human Resources question than a legal question but I don't know where else to ask this question. I am recenlty unemployed due to a corporate downsizing. Since it is easier to get a job while employed I was thinking of not revealing that I am currently unemployed and that I still work for my former employer. My question is do companies contact current employers for dates of employment during the hiring/interview process if you check off that they do not have your permission to do so? I understand if you don't have the answer. If not, can you point me in the direction of a site like yours that is more focused on HR questions?

  • #2
    Most reputable companies do not check references without telling you they are doing so. However, it is not illegal for them to do it. And, if they find at some point you have falsified your application, it would be grounds for termination at any company I've every worked at, and at those where my colleagues work as well.

    My advice is that you don't lie. Period. It will more than likely catch up with you in the end.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      I agree absolutely with Patty (and I am an HR consultant, not an attorney). Even if they do not call your "current" employer it is far, far easier than you might think for them to learn the truth, and the fact that you lied on your application would be grounds for immediate termination.

      In the current job market, the fact that you were laid off through no fault of your own should not count against you. You will be far better off telling the truth.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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