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Part-Time , Do I have to work?(Mass.)

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  • Part-Time , Do I have to work?(Mass.)

    I work at a retail store in MA, I work part time. Generally if I need a specific day off I can request it off the mandatory two weeks prior and there wont be a problem. Basically Im being forced to work the saturday after black friday. My work is telling me that you cant request time off as it is all "blacked out". This just dosnt seem normal to me, If I was full time I could see me taking time off a problem but that is why I am part time so I can have flexibility. Yes, I realize its the busiest time of the year for the company? Why do I need the time off? Family who I rarely see come and stay for that weekend we have a dinner that saturday its a tradition. To add to that now my friend who just joined the navy is coming back before he ships out to active duty and id like to see him as much as possible before he leaves and not be forced to work. Sorry for ranting and raving this really gets to me. My boss knows my reasons but still scheduled me that saturday, Anything I can do?

    Thanks

  • #2
    You cannot show up and get fired. Seriously, it is the employer's right to require staff to work as necessary. In retail, it is very common for full-time employees to get the first shot at the better days/times on the schedule; that's the advantage of full-time. You do not have to be granted days off just because you have something better to do.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      No, there is nothing you can do. The employer is not required to give you the time off you want.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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