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{NJ}Maximum lifting load of a single employee

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  • {NJ}Maximum lifting load of a single employee

    Is there any law stating the maximum weight any employee can lift on his or her own? I am 18, if that does anything.
    I work at a hardware store and have on many occasions almost fell off a ladder, pulled my shoulder or back, or a hernia. We have wat we call 'bays' in the front of store which is our display area and stock storage. We have during the season certain outdoor patio furniture and stuff which weighs upwards of 100Lbs sitting on shelves from 2 to 10 feet from the ground. So far the heaviest load I have lifted was, my memory is a little shot, but it was either a compact folding scaffold or a all steel work bench with partical board working area. This, I had to, by myself, cary about 5 up a ladder to the top shelf which sits about 9 feet from the ground and stack them on top of each other length wise. This really put a straing on my shoulder, neck and back. I already tore my shoulder and back up in a accident I had on my bicycle and weight training. I was in a lot of pain after that ordeal. Now I'm not some scrawny guy, I've got the leg muscles to lift my girlfriends car off is two back tires(1992 ford escort 2dr), that's not the point, going to bed with pain in my back from over excerting myself because the owner wants heavy stuff on a high is not acceptable. The money(7.50/hr 190/wk) isn't worth the pain I go through everyday.
    Quiting is not an option, I do not have the time to find another job before the holidays.

    Here are some of the object I have lifted either off the ground of from shelves. These are the exact products from my jobs website. (u) is for boxed and unassembled.

    Park Bench(u)
    Cast Iron Bistro set(all in one box)(u)
    Weber Grill(u)
    For grills we also have smaller and larger ones, all weighing in the box about 60-200Lbs, stacked upwards of four boxes high. During the season I was the one doing most of the stacking and assembling because I am pretty much the assembler of everything. Stacking these things more than two high is near impossible.

    And the grand daddy of the heaviest boxed item we carry
    Toro Two Stage Power Max Snow Blower(u)
    We had two of these stacked on top of each other, each weighing a whopping 240Lbs...each. Weight is clearly stated on the box.
    I had to pull one off in order to assemble it. Painful even with the owner pushing it so it falls on me even more.
    Last edited by toxic; 11-14-2005, 03:31 PM.

  • #2
    No, there is no law saying that an employee is limited to lifting only boxes of a certain weight unassisted.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ditto. It is very foolish of an employer not to provide hoists, forklifts or other equipment when employees have to handle or lift heavy weight objects but no laws require it.

      You can contact OSHA and see if this is a violation of their "general duty" clause though.

      Comment

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