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Is this legal?

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  • Is this legal?

    My employer recently gave me a form for medical insurance. I denied the insurance stating that I was already covered under a family member. They returned the form saying that I needed proof that I am covered, which I tried to provide but it wasn't specific enough for them. They told me that I have 30 days to find them proof or they will take deductions from my paycheck for medical insurance, even though I signed the refusal form and do not authorize these deductions. I am in Michigan, and am wondering a couple things:

    Is it legal for employers to require that their employees have medical insurance?
    Is it legal for them to require that I submit proof of medical insurance?
    Is it legal for them to take the deductions for insurance without my consent?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Is it legal for employers to require that their employees have medical insurance?

    Yes.

    Is it legal for them to require that I submit proof of medical insurance?

    Yes.

    Is it legal for them to take the deductions for insurance without my consent?

    Possibly. It depends on the terms of the insurance contract and exactly what you signed upon hiring.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      I do not remember ever signing anything regarding insurance deductions when being hired. Non of the people hired at the same time I was, remember signing any papers about it either. If I ask them, will they have to show me the paper I signed if I did in fact sign one during the hiring process?

      If I never signed one, is it still legal for them to take deductions?

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      • #4
        Again, the insurance contract may affect the answer.

        Why are you so opposed to providing proof of other coverage?
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          I tried to provide them with proof but it wasn't specific enough. I could always call the insurance company and request that they send something that is specific enough for my employer, but I am supposed to be a full time student in order to be on this insurance policy. I am not currently a full time student becuase I am in the process of transferring to a different university, and if I call, then I risk getting taken off the insurance, at least thats what I have been told. I am not trying to cheat the insurance system, as I have been and again will be a full time student within the next few weeks, but my employer is giving me 30 days to provide proof of insurance and I am a little hesitant to call until I am a full time student again so I am not sure what to do.

          Comment

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