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Salaried Slave

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  • Salaried Slave

    At this period of time the year is almost over and I can count on my hands how many days off I have had from Jan to Oct.
    I am an exempt salaried employee...but there has to be a law against working 14 to 25 days in a row without a day off....????

  • #2
    Only in a very few states and, even then, it is unclear whether those states include exempt employees as relates to that law. What state do you work in?
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      I work in Colorado

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      • #4
        I could not find anything in the Colorado labor law requiring a day of rest after XX consecutive days worked. You can contact the Colorado Division of Labor to confirm. Make sure you tell them you are an exempt employee.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          Unfortunately you live in Colorado, i lived tere for 20 years of my life and had to leave, and in Colorado when you are slararied, like most places, you may be required to work extra without compensation, i.e. day off after so many consecutive days of work. Exempt or not it is also an ERA state. Like Patty said contact a pro and let them know you are exempt but at this juncture there is not much you can do.

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          • #6
            Well, the "pro" I was talking about was the state Dept. of Labor.
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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            • #7
              Thank you Patty but nowhere in your previous post did you say aything about a pro the spammer did and last time I checked Colorado laws have not changed all that much...Have you ever lived in Colorado Patty???

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              • #8
                Thank you for the replies. It sounds like Colorado is a tough state to seek compensation as an exempt employee. I moved here from California a year ago and cannot believe what employers get away with here...

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                • #9
                  The spammer's post has been deleted. There are very few states that require one day of rest in seven and Colorado is not one of them. An exempt employee is required, in all 50 states, to work the hours that are required in order to get the work done.

                  End of story.
                  The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                  • #10
                    I am a little naive on labor law. Can someone explain "ERA" to me?

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                    • #11
                      I've never heard of that term relative to employment law either. To me, ERA has always stood for Equal Rights Amendment.

                      And, just for your information, I am an HR/Payroll Professional with over 26 years of experience. I can read laws and regulations, whether I live in the state or not. However, that's why I said you could contact the state Dept. of Labor to confirm.
                      I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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