Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Seems Fishy?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Seems Fishy?

    I tried to figure this one out, but can make nothing of the legal mumbo-jumbo in the handbooks and links - About to accept a live-in caregiver job for $90/day (plus room/board) but it's 24/7; not allowed to leave premises. I'll go nutts holed up in a house unable to go out for coffee with friends or a walk around the block now and then. How much non-duty time is allotted? What are the laws or requirements here? I can chose to work only 3-4-5 days at a time, but when I'm on premises I must be on premises the entire time; is this legal without more pay? How does that work? Located in CA -

  • #2
    Might I opine that you are about to accept a job for which you are clearly not suited? You need to think twice and perhaps a third time before making a decision.

    I'd also suggest you contact CA's DOL on your situation. There are usually special wage and hour laws for live-in caregivers.

    Comment


    • #3
      Why?

      What do you mean I'm not suited? As in an illegal immigrant, ignorant, or greedy? Just not a lot of experience with the 24hour shift policies. Now I'm even more confused...

      Comment


      • #4
        sheesh. Get the chip off your shoulder.

        Live-in caregivers are exactly that. If you can't accept the responsibilities and terms of the job, then perhaps that is not the job for you. That's all Beth was saying.

        And she gave you legal advice about the state Dept. of Labor. In California, it's the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement. Call them. And the next time you're asking for free advice, don't be so defensive or accusatory.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

        Comment


        • #5
          oops. sorry.

          okay; I'm sorry. Thank you for clearing it up. I have a friend who manages group homes in another state and she thought it was an insane set-up, as the care-givers there have 'relief hours' while the clients are working or in school. Other people say it's a great set-up, so I was unsure what to think and can't make sense of the legal crap - federal standards and laws vs. CA statutes. Obviously I'm not suited for law, or to jump offensively in defensive fear about a job situation I apparently know nothing about. (except how to do it.) Thanks for the reponses; sorry for any offense...

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, Patty. That's exactly what I was saying. About to accept a live-in caregiver job for $90/day (plus room/board) but it's 24/7; not allowed to leave premises. I'll go nutts holed up in a house unable to go out for coffee with friends or a walk around the block now and then. That sure sounds to me like this isn't the job for you, sobrrr1. I couldn't do it either.

            sobrrr1, being a manager of a group home is a far different proposition than being directly hired to provide in-home care for someone.

            Comment


            • #7
              True, True

              I hate hearing (or seeing) how ridiculous my thoughts are but somehow they don't sound so stupid in my head. Yes, being the manager of a group home is VERY different, but I was referring to the care-givers she oversees. But... DD adults also lead very different lives and schedules than do the elderly, so silly me to expect the same. I'm shrinking away now with my tail between my legs. Thanks.

              Comment


              • #8
                I was the staffing coordinator for a Home Health agency for two years and live-in positions have one care giver for say 5 days then a relief for 2 days. Some caregivers share it as a 4 to 3 split. The majority of your day will be free in your room but you are to be on the premises in case help is needed. Our caregivers also helped with simple household duties and with meal preparations. The two days off are your days to schedule any personal needs such as Doctors appointments and time with friends. It is a very demanding job but you do become like family to those in need.


                You may want to try being a live-in sub at first so that way you are only doing two day incriments. Or if this line of work is where your interests lie they have hourly shifts that extend past the normal 8 hours a day. It is called around the clock care. As a live in you are provided sleep time. Some clients (patients) are more in need of help and require constant attention. That is when an around the clock situation is deemed. This handled with 2-3 caregivers trading off. No one is allowed rest time (such as sleep).

                A live in situation is not something anyone with a family or many other responsibilities should attempt. It does take the majority of your life. I agree with your feelings towards the post from Beth. Sometimes people on these type of sites forget how something may read as opposed to how they meant it to come across. Her advice was accurate but her opinion should have been toned down a bit. "Free advice" does not in turn mean "get treated however I see fit..." Good luck with your choice. I have seen the best and the worst of caregivers and it is quite a task.

                Comment

                The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
                Working...
                X