Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Part Time to Full Time back to Part Time

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Part Time to Full Time back to Part Time

    I have an employee who began as part-time. We offered her full-time which she accepted. We gave her full-time status including paid insurance, paid vacations, paid sick leave and 11 paid holidays. She has now decided she wants to go back to part-time but feels she should be able to keep the full-time benefits. Is this correct?
    Katei Gross
    Junior Member
    Last edited by Katei Gross; 10-11-2005, 11:42 AM.

  • #2
    Not whatsoever. If your policy is full time is benefit eligible, part time not, then no reason to go outside that policy.

    Comment


    • #3
      Missouri: New Question.

      The employee now wants to know what the exact number of hours is they have to work to keep full time benefits. Is there a Law that states this. I have seldom worked with part-time employees but I always thought anything under 35 hours a week was entering part-time territory.

      Comment


      • #4
        This is not defined by law, but by contract and/or company policy. It's going to depend on what the company policy is/benefit contract says.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think this is part of our whole problem. We are a very small non-profit association. This is our first hourly employee and looking through the files there is a job description but not what constitues hours, benefits etc. I will remedy this ASAP. THANK YOU!

          Comment


          • #6
            With regards to health insurance, disability insurance, life insurance, anything on that line, you will probably find a definition of eligibility spelled out in the policy. With regards to vacation, sick time, personal time, holidays, or anything that does not utilize an outside agency or administrator (such as an insurance carrier) that's a company decision.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

            Comment

            The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
            Working...
            X