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Need Official Link for Florida Labor Laws...

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  • Need Official Link for Florida Labor Laws...

    I need a link to print out the law about giving lunch breaks and other "rest" breaks throughout the day in the state of Florida for my employee's... I've heard many rumors about 30 minutes for lunch and two 10 minute breaks during an 8 hour shift but I need something official other than word of mouth...

    I've been searching for almost 2 hours but I find that I either don't understand what I'm looking at or I just go link to link until I find myself completly off the main topic...

    If someone could just pass me the exact link I need to print this information out, I would greatly appreciative...

  • #2
    Well, you can try this, but if you find a law that says employees must get paid breaks and meal periods, I'd sure like to hear about it, because, to my knowledge, there are no such laws for nonminors. Florida has very few wage and hour laws of its own; for most things, it defaults to federal wage and hour regulations, which do not require rest breaks or meal periods either.
    http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/...%2D%3EPart%20I
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      So from my understanding, there is no requirements to give them any breaks in a legal working day...

      Also, what about overtime?? Is it absolutly required that once you hit over 40 hours in a week, I have to pay time and a half to whomever in the state of Florida??

      According to "448.01 Legal day's work; extra pay." it says that 10 hours is a legal working day unless a written contract is made saying that it is longer... So if I have someone working more then 10 hours a day without the contract, I have to pay him overtime?? Or how should I read that??

      LINK: 448.01

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      • #4
        I need a link to print out the law about giving lunch breaks and other "rest" breaks throughout the day in the state of Florida for my employee's... Florida has no such requirement. Nor do any federal laws require that employees be provided with meal and rest breaks.

        The only federal law that relates to this issue is that if an employer does decide to provide rest/meal breaks, they must be paid time if the break is less than 20 minutes in length.

        Also, what about overtime?? Is it absolutly required that once you hit over 40 hours in a week, I have to pay time and a half to whomever in the state of Florida?? Again, there is no Florida law on this as far as I am aware. Federal laws require that all non-exempt employees be paid time and a-half for all hours worked in excess of 40 in each 7-day pay period (with the exception of a very few, very specific speciality occupations that very likely don't apply to you.) Exempt employees need never be paid OT.

        The wage and hour law I'm referring to is the Fair Labor Standards Act. You can find it at www.dol.gov.
        Last edited by Beth3; 10-06-2005, 10:14 AM. Reason: typo

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        • #5
          Did you find the Link?

          I have been at my job for 5 months now. I have taken two 15 minute breaks every morning and afternoon. Now all of the sudden they are saying I only get one 15 minute break a day. one or the other morning or afternoon. I work a full 8 hour day. I would love to no the law on this.
          Originally posted by PureCrazed
          I need a link to print out the law about giving lunch breaks and other "rest" breaks throughout the day in the state of Florida for my employee's... I've heard many rumors about 30 minutes for lunch and two 10 minute breaks during an 8 hour shift but I need something official other than word of mouth...

          I've been searching for almost 2 hours but I find that I either don't understand what I'm looking at or I just go link to link until I find myself completly off the main topic...

          If someone could just pass me the exact link I need to print this information out, I would greatly appreciative...

          Comment


          • #6
            Did you fine the link of the Florida Laws?

            I have been on my job for 5 months now. I have taken two 15 minute breaks sense I started working here. One in the morning and in the afternoon. Now all of the sudden they are saying I only get one 15 minute break a day. Either in the morning or afternoon. I would love to know the facts and laws on this subject. Can you help me?

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            • #7
              Sandra, assuming you are in Florida also, see the link I posted in my earlier response. As several here have already stated, there are no laws requiring breaks and/or rest breaks for non-child labor in Florida. See here's the deal, if there is no law requiring it, then they don't have to provide the breaks/meal periods. And even if there is not such a law, if the employer requires you to take a break/meal period, you do.
              I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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              • #8
                Oh, and the "legal work day" has no effect on wage payment. Since Florida does not have a daily overtime requirement (nor even a state weekly overtime law), federal law applies. Over 40 in a workweek, time-and-a-half for nonexempt employees. Period.
                I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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