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  • Getting day off back

    Hi,
    I have worked for a small company in Illinois for 9 years. I am a good employee and a very hard worker. I used to have Mondays off until two and a half years ago when we were down one doctor and they needed me 5 days a week to pick up some of the slack. I am only support staff, but agreed to do this to help out. A year ago, I was preparing to sell my home and asked that I have Monday's returned in order to do the work that needed to be done. My boss said he would like me to hold off on that, stating that Monday's were really busy and he would be flexible with my vacation time. He was not. Now he is changing the vacation policy so vacation can only be taken in one week increments rather than a day at a time. I am starting to have health issues that I believe are related to the stress he has recently put me under and I have again requested Monday's off. Now he has given that day off to an employee that has been there 2 years. I don't want another day during the week. Monday was my day for 7 years and I gave it up to help them out. I also believe that he is trying to make me quit by scolding me for in front of clients and co-workers for things I haven't done and sending me home early stating that he's trying to cut payroll and I'm one of the highest paid. He's doing similar things to an employee with 8 years as well. He has a history of doing this. I am actively looking for new employment, but I'm divorced, 50 and until I find something I'm stuck. Is there anything I can do? Also, what are the Illinois laws regarding vacation?

    Thanks,
    Helen

  • #2
    The employer has the right to ask you to work the schedule the business needs. If you cannot work those days/hours, you're right, you should be looking for another position. Although it would have been nice to give you Mondays off instead of the other person, there is no law requiring your employer to do so.

    And vacation is not required to be offered in any state, so the employer can legally put any restrictions on the taking of vacation that he wants, including taking it in one week increments.

    Sorry, but there are no legal violations here.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Hi Patty,
      The third part of my question was, is it legal to try to make someone quit?It has become clear to me that is what is happening here, even by the statements that have been made about longevity and being highest paid.Followingme around and asking me what I'm doing, putting me on a project then telling me he doesn't want me doing it. Humiliating me in the presence of others and giving my day off to another employee. Please keep in mind that I am a very hard working conciencious person that comes from an era where people give their best. I am energetic, compassionate and by far his best worker. After nine years I've seen him do this to many others, he's known for high turn over. A hard working, 50 year old woman does not deserve this. My hard work and loyalty should have earned a little more than constantly being harrassed. Is there anything I can do until I find something different? Are small businesses exempt from fairness? He seems to really like the younger workers with the poor work ethics that call in sick a lot.

      Thanks

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      • #4
        No, there is nothing illegal about trying to make someone quit. Would you rather be fired?

        Unless he is doing this BECAUSE you are 50, nothing he is doing is illegal. I'm not saying that he's the best manager in the world or that I agree with the way he is going about this, but he is not violating the law.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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