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  • Working a holiday

    I am considered an exempt employee. Our payroll is due to be turned in on Sept 5 which is a company holiday. I will have to come in that day to get it all turned in. I had planned on leaving town for a long weekend and not coming back until Monday night. Do I HAVE to go in?

  • #2
    In the sense that no one is holding a gun to your head, no. But if you are asking whether or not the company can legally require you to work on a holiday, the answer is yes, they can. If you are asking whether you can be disciplined for refusing to come in, the answer is yes, you can; in fact you can be terminated for refusing to come in.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Everyone else in the office will be off and I have to come in? Something seems to be little off there.

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      • #4
        That's what happens in payroll. If you're going to stay in payroll, you need to expect that.

        However, I have to say that, as Sept 5 is a federal holiday, who the heck is processing your payroll that is requiring you input on a holiday? Every processor I have EVER known has always provided a holiday schedule, backing up the dates if necessary.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          The thing a great many employees do not understand is that having holidays off is not a right. There are plenty of people who regularly work on holidays. Police and firemen. EMT's. Doctors, nurses and other medical personnel. Hotel clerks. Salespeople. Taxi drivers. Airline and train personnel. Holidays are some of the busiest workdays for these people.

          You may certainly ASK your employer if, having worked the holiday while everyone else is off, you may take another day off later in the week. I don't think that would be unreasonable. But they are not required to agree.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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          • #6
            um, cbg, and Payroll Managers!
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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            • #7
              Given the point of the thread, I kinda thought that went without saying. But yes, also payroll managers, and often hr managers as well.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                The only holidays I can ever count on are Thanksgiving and Christmas.

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                • #9
                  Sockeye, I have to admit I've never had to work Christmas or Thanksgiving either. But New Year' Day? Labor Day? Memorial Day? BTDT
                  I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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                  • #10
                    It was a long time ago, but I even remember coming in on Thanksgiving once to input - yes, Patty - payroll information.
                    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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