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Regarding definition of full-time...

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  • Regarding definition of full-time...

    I've worked for a newspaper in West Virginia for over five years. I have my pay stubs for the last four years proving I've regularly worked at least 37 hours per week and quite often over 40. The paper still considers me a part-time employee, and thus not eligible for any benefits. I'm having difficulty in researching this matter myself, and was wondering if anyone knows what I may or may not be entitled to.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Bikke the Pirate
    I've worked for a newspaper in West Virginia for over five years. I have my pay stubs for the last four years proving I've regularly worked at least 37 hours per week and quite often over 40. The paper still considers me a part-time employee, and thus not eligible for any benefits. I'm having difficulty in researching this matter myself, and was wondering if anyone knows what I may or may not be entitled to.

    Typical state and federal laws consider anyone working more than 37ish hours a full time employee.. I would call your local labor division and speak with a representitave..

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    • #3
      Full-Time

      You find any regulations as to the definition of a full-time employee. The definition may be found in the plan document of the benefit, prepared by the insurer and the employer.

      In similar situations, I have often found that the problem is an oversight of the employer. And, if researched within the plan document, the label of full-time is not relevant. Instead, the employer should be looking at the number of hours you are working per week on average or over a period of time. For example, in some of the plans that my staff managed, the plan said that a person who works over 35 hours a week for 3 out of 4 weeks would be considered as eligible for benefits.

      My suggestion is that you go to the HR Department and ask them about the eligibility for benefits. If you find that they are not helpful, you may wish to contact the insurer and ask them.
      Lillian Connell

      Forum Moderator
      www.laborlawtalk.com

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