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California - Appropriate Compensation for Duties Performed

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  • California - Appropriate Compensation for Duties Performed

    One year ago my department was staffed by three people. Then one man terminated his employment and moved to Egypt. One month later my boss (director of the department) died. I have been doing the job of three people for the past year, holding the department together, representing the department in all meetings, travel, etc. I have asked to be named the new director, but was told "no". The pay scale for the director's position is more than what I am making. Since I have been doing the job of the director (in all aspects) shouldn't I be given a raise to the scale?

  • #2
    Sounds to me like you deserve a raise. However, the employer is under no legal obligation to give you one. As long as you are willing to do more work for less pay, the employer will continue to take advantage of that.
    In Solidarity,

    Wayne

    www.waynemarshall.org

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    • #3
      Only you know the climate of your place of employment, and when you have no legal recourse for doing what used to be the work of three people, you know you are competent to be named director. I've been there, I know how frustrating it can be. I can only tell you how I handled it but be forewarned: any type of interaction with Human Resources can become a problem.

      I asked to be promoted with or without a raise. In other words, if they couldn't adequately pay me, I wanted at least the authority that came with the responsibility I was taking on. That, I got. But I didn't get it in writing so when they chose to, they failed to identify me as the director.

      Eventually I got this changed too.

      You might want to write up up a clear statement like the one you wrote to us. Detail who used to work in your department and who is currently working in your department, what responsibilities you currently have which you did not have before the other people left.

      Attach any of your personnel reviews that are appropriate; letters from customers about you, etc. Then ask that this be put into your personnel file.

      Don't forget to include any information about changes in the company that show you have more or less work now than you all had previously, just to be fair.

      Of course if you think this action would cause problems for you, don't do it.
      Last edited by xild; 03-20-2005, 01:10 PM.
      I'm not an authority on labor law. My interest lies in the employer/employee relationship in what I feel are difficult times for both.

      Comment

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