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Training wage or full wage?

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  • Training wage or full wage?

    I work in California for an oilfield company. We are REQUIRED by the company to take certain classes concerning safety, etc. My question is that they only pay us a minimum wage rather than our full wage stating that they do not have to pay our normal wage. I have been told by others that it is not in compliance with labor laws as it is REQUIRED and not an option, but want to know from someone actually in the know. Can you help and let me know the real law and what it has to say or point me in the right direction?

    Thank you,
    jess

  • #2
    Training Wage

    Your employer does not have to pay you your usual rate during training. And, if the training is not directly related to your present job, your employer doesn't have to pay you at all. Examples of training not directly related to your job are - training that is required to keep you up-to-date with some government licensing requirement, such as an update of CPR procedures for medical personnel or training in gun use for a armed security guard.
    Lillian Connell

    Forum Moderator
    www.laborlawtalk.com

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    • #3
      Thanks for your reply. Could you direct me to where I can get this information?

      Thanks,

      Jess

      Comment


      • #4
        Training Wage

        You can read California's interpretation at section 46.6.5 (page 188) of the manual found at: http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/DLSEManua...enfcmanual.pdf
        Lillian Connell

        Forum Moderator
        www.laborlawtalk.com

        Comment

        The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
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