Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New to Exempt Status

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New to Exempt Status

    I just started a job in IA where I am now exempt...new to me - so I have some questions as I have received confliciting information. The company has a PTO plan - which includes vacation and sick time all in one.


    1) If I have a doctor's appointment (just a check up) - am I required to take PTO for it? At first I thought no, but was later told yes.

    2) If there is a difference between a doctor's visit and 'other' time away - what would the difference be? When do I not need to take PTO?

    3) If I would always need to take PTO then what is the benefit to me for being exempt?

    Any info would be great!

  • #2
    PTO Questions

    The answers to your questions are as follows:

    1) If I have a doctor's appointment (just a check up) - am I required to take PTO for it? At first I thought no, but was later told yes. The answer to this question is up to your employer. While salaried employees may not have their pay reduced for partial days of work (with a few exceptions), an employer may deduct time from a leave bank, such as what you have with the PTO benefit.
    2) If there is a difference between a doctor's visit and 'other' time away - what would the difference be? When do I not need to take PTO? Again, this is answer that must be supplied by your employer. Since federal and state law do not require that employers provide PTO, the rules for its use is left to the employer.
    3) If I would always need to take PTO then what is the benefit to me for being exempt? Great question...as a former HR executive, I was occasionally faced with employees who wanted to be exempt...I believe for the status more than anything else. Once I explained to them that being exempt means that you can work as many hours as needed by the employer without any additional compensation, their desire to become exempt waned.

    Other than that matter, there may be reasons that being exempt is advantageous to your own situation. As I mentioned earlier, an exempt person's pay cannot be reduced for partial days of work. Also, a number of employers provide additional benefits for exempt employees. And, there is also the issue of pay. Exempt employees tend to make more, on an annual basis, than non-exempt employees. (Of course, the latter is not true if a company has a lot of overtime.)
    Lillian Connell

    Forum Moderator
    www.laborlawtalk.com

    Comment

    The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
    Working...
    X