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Affordable Health Care and Seasonal Employees Massachusetts

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  • Affordable Health Care and Seasonal Employees Massachusetts

    Hi.
    Hiring an employee who will work 40 hours per week for approximately 5 weeks. We have less than 50 employees. He will be doing filing and accounting since this our busy time so I would say he's "seasonal".
    Do I have to offer him health care under the ACA? Thanks.

  • #2
    http://www.wiggin.com/showarticle.aspx?show=14382& Lots of factors to consider but you can find the basics at the link. Your state also does have some relevant laws of its own. http://www.mass.gov/ago/doing-busine...e-mandate.html
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      NOT my area of expertise, but as far as I know we still also have the older ERISA rules in play, which basically say do whatever your published SPD says. This implies that each employer should want to look at the ACA and state requirements, and then modify their ERISA SPD as needed to come into compliance.
      "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
      Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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      • #4
        What is your current eligibility period? You might want to see if you can "class out" temporary or seasonal employees. It used to be possible and might still be under the 90 day eligibility maximum under ACA. If you have an immediate eligibility upon hire and no "class out" under your current plan/SPD , I am not sure at this point that you have a choice but to follow as it is written.

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