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no compensation for working higher paying jobs Mississippi

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  • no compensation for working higher paying jobs Mississippi

    is it illegal for a company to make you work in other job codes that pay more without paying you more for you doing their work like in my situation the company i work for the area i work i am at a pay grade of 4 but i am being scheduled in and area with a pay grade of 5 which if i was working in that area it would mean a .20 cent increase per hour and another person i work with is at a pay grade of 3 and is being forced to work in a area of a pay grade of 6 which would mean a .80 cent increase in pay per hour in which neither of us is getting any pay increase for working in these areas and another question is it illegal for a company that has policies about a worker not working more than 6 days straight a week but they are being scheduled between 8 to 10 days straight in a giving week and not getting any compensation in pay for this any answers would be greatly appreciated thank you

  • #2
    Unless you are subject to a collective bargaining agreement that would address situations such as yours, there is no law that requires an employer to pay you more for doing work outside your salary grade.
    I am not able to respond to private messages. Thanks!

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    • #3
      The law does not care diddly about pay grades. As far as the law is concerned, if you are non-exempt and receiving minimum wage plus overtime when worked, or if you are exempt and making $455 per week, the law is satisfied. Pay grades are entirely an internal function. As Marketeer suggests, unless you have a union or other contract that addresses the question, it's entirely up to the employer.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by overworkedandunderpaid82 View Post
        another question is it illegal for a company that has policies about a worker not working more than 6 days straight a week but they are being scheduled between 8 to 10 days straight in a giving week and not getting any compensation in pay for this any answers would be greatly appreciated thank you
        Are you non-exempt or exempt? ("seems" non-exempt)

        What do you mean by not getting any compensation in pay when scheduled between 8-10 days straight? Do you mean overtime pay - in your state you get OT pay when working over 40 hrs. in a *workweek*. Each workweek stands alone.

        An FLSA workweek is a fixed, regularly-recurring period of 168 hours – that is, seven, consecutive, 24-hour periods – that the employer expressly adopts in order to maintain FLSA compliance.

        Also, company policies (such as not working more than 6 days straight) can be changed unless there is a binding employment contract or CBA to the contrary.

        PS - The above info re OT is for a non-exempt employee - an exempt employee does not have to be paid any additional pay over their regular fixed weekly salary no matter how many hrs. a week they work.
        Last edited by Betty3; 06-28-2013, 08:29 AM. Reason: add PS
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