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attending a work related meeting unpaid: Illinois

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  • attending a work related meeting unpaid: Illinois

    I work on a college campus as an hourly student employee. There are employee meetings on a day I'm not scheduled to work held inside a school building. The meetings are mandatory, but they do not compensate us for our time during these meetings. Is this legal?

  • #2
    Sounds not legal for an hourly non-exempt employee.

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs22.pdf

    Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs: Attendance at lectures, meetings, training programs and similar activities need not be counted as working time only if four criteria are met, namely: it is outside normal hours, it is voluntary, not job related, and no other work is concurrently performed.
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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    • #3
      Thank you so much for an official source. It's so difficult to find anything of substance online. I figured that it was against some sort of law to be required to go to a meeting off the clock, but couldn't find anything I could actually point to saying as much.

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      • #4
        You're welcome. There it is in black & white.
        Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

        Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

        Comment


        • #5
          Not your question, but just a warning:

          The law has not been broken until you have attended the meeting, gotten your check, and found no pay for that time in it. So just in case you have it in mind to refuse to attend the meeting, DON'T. You can be fired for refusing to attend, and it will be a legal firing, because even if they have announced their intentions of not paying you for the time, they have not broken the law by making that announcement - only by not doing it.

          So go to the meeting, and if you are not paid for it, file a complaint with the state DOL. DO NOT refuse to attend.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cbg View Post
            Not your question, but just a warning:

            The law has not been broken until you have attended the meeting, gotten your check, and found no pay for that time in it. So just in case you have it in mind to refuse to attend the meeting, DON'T. You can be fired for refusing to attend, and it will be a legal firing, because even if they have announced their intentions of not paying you for the time, they have not broken the law by making that announcement - only by not doing it.

            So go to the meeting, and if you are not paid for it, file a complaint with the state DOL. DO NOT refuse to attend.
            Wow, that's a really silly law. Thanks a lot for the advice. I just informed my boss of the law, since I'm pretty sure it was just an honest mistake rather than trying to scam the employees. Everyone on this campus is very strict about adhering to every possible rule, so just letting her know that the rule exist will almost certainly settle the whole matter.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nobodyspecific View Post
              Wow, that's a really silly law. Thanks a lot for the advice. I just informed my boss of the law, since I'm pretty sure it was just an honest mistake rather than trying to scam the employees. Everyone on this campus is very strict about adhering to every possible rule, so just letting her know that the rule exist will almost certainly settle the whole matter.
              It makes perfect sense. You can't be held accountable for something someone thinks you may do. A law isn't broken until someone does not follow it.

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              • #8
                Okay, let's work this through.

                Your employer announces that you have to attend this meeting and you will not be paid for it. We will accept that this is due to ignorance and not malice, but for whatever reason, he says it.

                You come to LLT and learn that it is illegal; tell the employer; who says, Thanks for letting me know - we'll take care of it. They do not, not realizing that it's necessary, make a general announcement that yes, you will get paid after all.

                One of your co-workers skips the meeting on the basis that s/he thinks they will not get paid for it, and/or files a claim with the state to the effect that the employer is violating the law.

                Now, who do you think it going to end up in a bad light in that scenario?
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The bottom line is they have to pay you when you attend these meetings & you must
                  attend them if you are told to or there can be consequences.
                  Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                  Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                  Comment

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