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Break vs. split shift or no shift

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  • Break vs. split shift or no shift

    I am new to the group and please forgive me if I am overstepping the conversation but I am not sure how to start a new thread.

    I'm in a situation where I live in rural California. Since the job market is very narrow I have been making concessions to my current employer so I could have job. Not much of one recently.

    On my scheduled day's I am to arrive at 10:30am and normally (in summer season) work until 7pm. It's been slow so I have been working from 10:30am to 12:30pm sent home and then having to call in to see if they need me back by 4:30 to complete my shift until 7pm.

    On the whole I have only been working 2 hours a day. I am aware of the 4 hour minimum and have not enforced it. I am curious though what I would be intitled to for the 10:30am to 12:30 and then again the 4:30 to 7pm.

    I'm frustrated because I have to list when I work an 8 hour shift that I take a half an hour break which is never done. Maybe 15 minutes max. if ever... all day.

    I stopped by the store/pizza place (I work in the kitchen) today and the owner told me he docked me 15 minutes for yesterday because I took a break in my 2 hour shift. All my work was done and I had nothing to do. What yaps at me is on Saturday I was there from 10:00am to 6:30 (listed a half an hour break which was not taken) and I worked all the way through non stop.

    Tomorrow is slated to be busy and most likely I will not get a break and I plan to write done no break if I don't get one.

    As I understand it, for every 4 hours worked a paid 10minute break is allowed. Please correct me if I am wrong. So if I work 8 hours then I should have 20minutes to rest and be paid.

    I need to do something because I feel I have been more than flexible and they are now splitting hairs.

    Kindest regards,
    Deborah

  • #2
    Deborah, I will start a new thread for you.
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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    • #3
      Thank you

      Thank you Betty for starting this new thread for me.

      On another side note, I have been looking for another job and I am finding that many job's are listed for maybe 2 to 3 hours a day and that is it. Is this the new trend? Yikes.....

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      • #4
        Another thought. What is the legal amount of time before cancelling a shift. Is it 24hours or less/more without pay?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Deborah Mills View Post
          Another thought. What is the legal amount of time before cancelling a shift. Is it 24hours or less/more without pay?
          No such rule. The closest there is to a similar rule is the following.
          http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_ReportingTimePay.htm
          "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
          Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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          • #6
            Regarding your first question, I can give you the rules on breaks and meals.

            http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_RestPeriods.htm

            http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_MealPeriods.htm

            http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/workhours/breaks.htm

            ------

            CA has a rule on split shifts (sort of), but CA-DLSE has made very little information available. Everything that I know on the subject can be found in the following Wage Order citation.

            4. Minimum Wages ...
            C) When an employee works a split shift, one hour’s pay at the minimum wage shall be paid in addition to the minimum wage for that workday, except when the employee resides at the place of employment.
            "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
            Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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