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Washington - Being required to have no options in order to get health insurance?

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  • Washington - Being required to have no options in order to get health insurance?

    Like many small businesses, the company my wife is working for is reducing the amount of insurance coverage they offer employees. I get it, it costs too much and they can't afford it. No objection, per se, it's been getting worse for the past 5 years (worse = costs more, covers less).

    But now they're asking her to sign a statement saying "she has no access to any other health insurance" in order for her to get any insurance coverage through the company. Is that legal?

    I can put her on my insurance, but that's not free, and of course there's no guarantee my company won't keep increasing the premiums we pay for family coverage. It'd be less expensive and provide more flexibility for her to stay on her own insurance.

  • #2
    Yes, it's legal. There is no law against it.
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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    • #3
      Thanks. This is the first time I've run across this. I've had companies check to see if my spouse had insurance and charge more, but never ask if I had insurance options elsewhere (i.e. pawning off the cost of covering me on my spouse).

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      • #4
        You may not have encountered it before, but it's actually becoming rather common.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jcricket View Post
          Thanks.
          You're welcome. As cbg noted, this is becoming more & more common.
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by cbg View Post
            You may not have encountered it before, but it's actually becoming rather common.
            Wow - pretty sad trend if that's the case (again, not a single person I've worked with or in my friends network in WA state or elsewhere has ever heard of this). How would this even work?

            What if her company and my company both made each of us sign the same thing? How would that even work? She'd be ineligible and I'd be ineligible. Or maybe it would flip and flop back and forth every time one of them changed insurance plans.

            This isn't the same, imho, as saying "if your spouse can get coverage elsewhere, we aren't going to subsidize them on our insurance". Seems kind of like a race to the bottom if you ask me.
            Last edited by jcricket; 08-06-2010, 09:13 PM.

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            • #7
              Well, take heart; the changes to health insurance laws that are upcoming will soon put an end to this. However, for the moment, it is still legal.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cbg View Post
                Well, take heart; the changes to health insurance laws that are upcoming will soon put an end to this. However, for the moment, it is still legal.
                Like I said. Thanks. Lame and poor employee relations, but not illegal.

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