Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

exempt employee question Ohio

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • exempt employee question Ohio

    I am an exempt employee in Ohio. I am currently required to work 40 hours a week 8-5 with few exceptions. I do receive comp time for hours scheduled outside of my normal work hours.
    I always work about 50 hours a week because I either voluntarily stay late to finish projects or do not take a whole hour for lunch. Occasionally I get to the office at 8:03 am but always stay past 5pm even on the days that I am early.
    Recently my supervisor stated that when you are late you owe her double time above and beyond any voluntary time. For example, if I come in at 8:02 am I owe her four minutes. I need to get approved ahead of time how I am going to make up that time The reverse does not apply though. If I come in at 7:55 am I cannot leave at 4:55 pm. That is considered donated time. I hope this makes sense.
    I think the policy is ridiculous as I always put in more than my required time plus the reverse does not apply. Is this policy enforceable? Am I able to fight it? It sounds like an awful lot of micromanaging to me. Thanks!

  • #2
    It may be ridiculous (and I do not disagree) but issues about what hours are worked, regardless of your exempt status, are up to the employer. The law is not going to take a stand either way.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. So she can require me to give her back "missed" time double, correct?

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, she can. I think it's petty, but there is nothing in the law that will prevent it.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment

        The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
        Working...
        X