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Not getting a snow day Ohio

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  • Not getting a snow day Ohio

    I work in an adjacent county and commute to my work place more than an hour every day. I was told by my employer (this is a center for children with austism) that "we will never close for a snow emergency...." I was also told that if my residence is under a snow emergency "level 3" where you are not allowed to drive on the roads I still have to show up for work. Is this legal? If we do not show up it is counted against our attendance the same as just calling off (it goes against our attendance) I understand not getting paid, but i don't think that they should be able to penalize me for this...... please weigh in with fact not opinion. thank you
    stepbystep445
    Junior Member
    Last edited by stepbystep445; 02-08-2010, 06:17 PM. Reason: i misspoke

  • #2
    It is legal because no law requires your employer to exempt you from work because of snow. This is expecially true if you work in a field such as yours where the clients still need care regardless of the weather.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
      It is legal because no law requires your employer to exempt you from work because of snow. This is expecially true if you work in a field such as yours where the clients still need care regardless of the weather.
      In ohio, level three snow emergency subjects drivers (with exception for emergency medical personnel and a few others) to arrest if they are on the roads. I'm not sure that an employer could legally require you to break the law if you are not one of these exceptions. This might be a public policy exception to at will. Note the "might".

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