Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Company moving - Commute MUCH longer Florida

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Company moving - Commute MUCH longer Florida

    My company is moving 19.7 miles from its current location. That will be the full increase in distance of a one-way trip for most of us.

    That comes to 197 miles a week and about 4-1/2 hours of personal time. Both of those numbers are in addition to whatever we are already doing.

    We received a memo say that we either must commit within 10 days or our positions will be posted as vacant (we're fired if we don't commit).

    There are two options.

    1) I commit.
    2) I don't commit (with an asterisk). The asterisk states that it is my responsibility to find employment within our company or elsewhere.

    This all sounds like they're putting the onus of responsibility on us and will not pay unemployment.

    It will be a significant pay cut for almost everyone. Maybe two people actually live in that area so for them it will be a pay raise. But the majority of us live near where we work now.

    My question is if we are eligible for unemployment when the company makes a move like this that results in a drastic pay cut. For me it would mean possibly not having the minimum to meet my bills but it's probably right on the line.

    Any comments or advice are appreciated. I can post the actual memos if that would be helpful.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Your employer doesn't decide if you get UI benefits - the state does.

    The state will make a decision as to whether they believe that is a significant enough further distance to qualify for unemployment ins. if you don't commit to moving. You could call the UI office & ask but they won't give you a definite answer over the phone - you would have to apply.
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Betty3 View Post
      Your employer doesn't decide if you get UI benefits - the state does.

      The state will make a decision as to whether they believe that is a significant enough further distance to qualify for unemployment ins. if you don't commit to moving. You could call the UI office & ask but they won't give you a definite answer over the phone - you would have to apply.
      Betty - Yes, I understand the only thing my company can do is fight. It's not their decision. I'm sure they will fight though. Do you happen to know if there is some kind of guideline - such as an increase in mileage or additional cost to the employee to get to and from work?

      Also, are you saying I can apply for benefits even while having a job that I don't plan to continue with?

      Comment


      • #4
        My advice is to decide what is going to be more lucrative for you at the present time. If you do not commit and lose your job, then how long will it be before UI benefits are paid, and will those UI benefits pay you more than your current job?

        I understand the time restraints, but it seems you may want to continue employment where you are until a new job is found, especially in this economy.

        Just words of experience speaking, the last time I filed for UI benefits it was almost 6 months before I received my first benefit check and had I not had a savings to live on we (my family and I) would have been in very serious trouble.

        Best of luck to you regardless of what you decide.
        Not everything in America is actionable in a court of law. Please remember that attorneys are in business for profit, and they get paid regardless of whether or not you win or lose.

        I offer my knowledge and experience at no charge, I admit that I am NOT infallible, I am wrong sometimes, hopefully another responder will correct me if that is the case with the answer above, regardless, it is your responsibility to verify any and all information provided.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by CafeenMan View Post
          Betty - Yes, I understand the only thing my company can do is fight. It's not their decision. I'm sure they will fight though. Do you happen to know if there is some kind of guideline - such as an increase in mileage or additional cost to the employee to get to and from work?

          Also, are you saying I can apply for benefits even while having a job that I don't plan to continue with?
          Each state has different guidelines. re UI, I was saying the UI office "might" give you a tentative guideline if you called & asked but they wouldn't make a definite decision unless you were fired or quit & applied for benefits.
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

          Comment


          • #6
            197 extra miles per week? I drive 330 miles per week total.
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

            Comment


            • #7
              120 miles a day.

              Comment


              • #8
                There is no bright line at which the distance of a corporate move becomes a qualifying event to quit and get unemployment benefits. Even within a single state, different regions will be looked at differently. Since among the factors that will be examined will be the average commute in the area, what kind of public transportation is available, availability of other jobs in the area, the infrastructure, and various other like factors, different parts of the same state will have a different result. In my state, a commute of two hours each way is fairly common in the east; in the western half of the state, that would not be considered reasonable.

                So there really is no way anyone here can tell you what options you have with regards to unemployment.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by GotSmart View Post
                  120 miles a day.
                  One word. Ouch.
                  I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I did 120 miles a day for a while. You should have heard what the tire man had to say to me when I had my tires replaced after six months.
                    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Times change...

                      Originally posted by GotSmart View Post
                      120 miles a day.
                      and so do expectations. My wife's aunt and uncle lived for many years in a small town dominated by a textile mill. They shopped at the company store, lived in company housing, and the uncle walked to work in the mill each day. They asked me once, on a visit, how far I drove to work each day, and were horrified to hear that I commuted 12 miles each way. 12 miles was the distance they drove every two weeks to go to a slightly larger town (+/- 3,000 pop.) to buy groceries, pay utility bills, and see the sights, and every two weeks was often enough to make that long trip. Heck, I was glad to do the 12 miles, having just changed jobs and given up a 38 mile one way commute.

                      I know people who have driven up to 90 miles one way to get to work, and thought nothing of it. Now, I don't commute, and that suits me just fine. I live in my pickup for work, however, and these days I rail against the traffic just like I did when I went long distances to get to work....

                      It's all relative... And, you need to really enjoy what you do, no matter how you get there.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I used to be a commercial plumber in the SF Bay area. It was not unusual to do 400 miles a day in the course of work. Fighting traffic the whole way.

                        Now I can look at the birds (hawks and wild turkeys) and deer and enjoy roads without more than a few cars on them.

                        Now I drive for an hour, play 8 hours with my little old children, and then head out to meditate on the drive home. Life is good.

                        I used to walk to work. The wife would page me when there were problems~~~~

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ok, I get it. There's always someone who has it worse. I could type my whole sob story but it would be irrelevant. Actually, I type 110+ wpm so I'll be irrelevant for a moment.

                          I started working three twelves. Then got moved to four tens. Then got moved to five eights. Then a 1/2 lunch that I never get got thrown in. During that lunch we are not allowed to leave the facility or do anything personal on our computer. We can go and eat and that's it. If we don't want to eat and have, say an errand to run, we aren't allowed to. I doubt that whole thing is legal either. How can you not pay me and still tell me what to do?

                          Anyway, all those things added up to significant loss of free time.

                          My new commute will be diagonally across two counties. There is no fast way to get there. It's zig-zag all the way. My current destination takes 20-25 minutes and it's a straight shot.

                          My new destination will probably take about an hour. I haven't done the math from back when but since I've started working here I've probably lost 12-15 additional hours of my free time that I'm not being paid for.

                          Lastly, this pay cut/cost increase... whatever you want to call it, exceeds all the pay raises I've received in the six years I've worked there combined. So my net will be less than when I started.

                          /End Sob Story

                          Anyway, seems like I have to be "vacated" before I can find out if I'm eligible for benefits. Not much of an option there really. Seems the best thing to do is commit and then just not do it if I can find a better solution.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Some relevant questions to ask yourself.

                            Are you happy with the job?
                            Good pay?
                            Clean environment?
                            Benefits?
                            retirement?

                            Today any job is better than no job. I have 17+ years education, and am taking care of mental patients until I have the final 1 1/2 years of education. I got hit by a drunk driver and my plumbing career went byby. I love what I do, but it only pays enough to survive.

                            Times are hard, and the laws are not favoring the little guy. Get some good music, and enjoy the commute.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GotSmart View Post
                              Some relevant questions to ask yourself.

                              Are you happy with the job?
                              Good pay?
                              Clean environment?
                              Benefits?
                              retirement?

                              Today any job is better than no job. I have 17+ years education, and am taking care of mental patients until I have the final 1 1/2 years of education. I got hit by a drunk driver and my plumbing career went byby. I love what I do, but it only pays enough to survive.

                              Times are hard, and the laws are not favoring the little guy. Get some good music, and enjoy the commute.
                              Pretty much no to all the above. I could love my job but management would need complete replacement and that's not going to happen.

                              Take a problem to them and their answer (I'm serious) is, "Well, the job market isn't that good right now."

                              Ok, but the problem I'm talking about is lack of supplies such as latex gloves considering almost all of our clients have Hep C, HIV or something else nasty.

                              Not sure if that's clear. Basically instead of addressing legitimate issues, stfu or quit.

                              Anyway, they're right. The job market is pretty crappy. I'm a creative person and creative jobs that pay well and are vacant are about, oh, impossible to come by.

                              This is me: www.airfieldmodels.com

                              Comment

                              The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
                              Working...
                              X