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Employer Poverty Empowerment Michigan

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  • Employer Poverty Empowerment Michigan

    Hello, I'm sending you this email because I have a question. I don't know if you offer advise for free, but I'm in a hard spot trying to help my mom. My mom was employed with a company for over 10 years driving small busses for pre-school children. A couple months back, she accidently left a child on the bus when she punched out. She takes full responsibility of her actions and attempt to fight for her job back. Her place of employment told her that she would get her unemployment, but when she tried to fight for her job back her employer told her that she wouldn't receive her unemployment. My mom appealed the case and went to court in front of a judge where she pleaded for her unemployment. Her employer even admitted to the judge that they did tell my mom that she would receive her unemployment. I'm not the smartest guy on earth but I'm trying to do research for my mom to see if she has a chance to fight this. My mom isn't as educated as I am and isn't familiar with the big words her company uses to make her feel incompetent. I would really appreciate it if you got back with me. Thank you so much for your time.

  • #2
    It is not the employer's decision whether she gets unemployment or not. It is completely up to the state. UI is not a needs-based program; you get it if you qualify; you don't get it if you don't. Leaving a child on the bus is a serious thing and I can easily see it disqualifying her regardless of what the employer said - it's not the employer's call.

    Certainly she can appeal but the decision will be made entirely by the state and on no issue except whether or not the infraction is or is not serious enough to disqualify her, not on how much she needs it or on what the employer told her.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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