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Theft and Unemployment! Connecticut

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  • Theft and Unemployment! Connecticut

    I have an employee that I suspect is stealing. I don't have enough evidence to prosecute, but I want her gone. However, I do not want her to claim unemployment! If I cut her down to say 8 hours (from 40) is she eligible for unemployment because her hours have been cut? Not sure how this works...

  • #2
    If you cut her hours from 40 to 8, yes, there is a very good chance that she will qualify for unemployment.

    If you want her disqualified, the way to do it is not to make up excuses but to call a spade a spade. "She was fired because I had reason to believe that she was stealing from me and here are my reasons". There is no way to guarantee what the state will decide - I've seen some pretty strange decisions in both directions. But you're not going to disqualify her from benefits by cutting her hours - that's a good way of making sure that she DOES get them.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      You can terminate her for suspected theft. I assume you have documented reasons as to why you believe this to be the case.
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

      Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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      • #4
        I can understand having an employee that you are quite sure is doing things, like stealing, that you can't prove, and you don't want to document for anyone why you feel that way. There are some employees who have learned to game the system so well that you don't want to (and can't if you want to accomplish your objectives with regard to them) give them anything that they can use as ammunition.

        One of the unwritten rules is that if you make big moves or changes, it can be challenged more easily than small moves or changes. Cutting hours from 40 to 8 is a big move. Cutting hours from 40 to 32 is a little move. After a month or two, reducing from 32 to 24 may be still a small move (a little more iffy though). For someone making more than the minimum wage, small pay reductions, on a going forward basis can be made. Business requirements change over time. It is fair when changes occur that you make the changes in a way that favor the employees who are doing the most to further your business objectives.

        Over a period of time, almost anyone can be encouraged to leave on their own accord. However, if the theft issue is immediate and it is important to get that person out without delay, terminate immediately. When you are given the opportunity to explain for unemployment purposes tell them that suspected theft was the reason, along with any other issues that you may have with that employee that you haven't told us about. They will decide; no way in advance to predict in whose favor they will decide.

        Your choice depending on how long you feel you have to work the problem.
        Please post questions on the forum rather than sending me a private message or email. That way others who have similar issues have access to the discussion.

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        • #5
          Why are you more worried about her getting UI than her continuing to allegedly steal from you?
          My opinion is to terminate her ASAP, and document well.
          Good luck!

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          • #6
            I also would terminate immediately if you suspect her of stealing from you - why wait? (terminate for suspected theft)
            Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

            Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

            Comment

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