Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Punch card calculation? Iowa

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Punch card calculation? Iowa

    I write down my hours at the end of every week and calculate my hours so I know how much money to expect on my paycheck and the past two paychecks at my new job have been off. I enformed my boss of the error and he told me he would add them to my next paycheck and here it is two weeks later and not only are the ours not added, but my pay is off again. Is there anything I can do to ensure that I will receive lost pay?
    Last edited by MikeOf1942; 08-30-2009, 08:20 PM.

  • #2
    Sure. First of all, your employer is either not very good at processing payroll, or they are messing with you. Either is possible. If the errors always go the employers way, that is likely indicative.

    If the employer is bad at processing payroll, talking to them might help. In fact, talking to them might also help if they are just messing with you (or not). Accounts Payable reported to me at a company where we had a trucking vendor who would make deliberate billing mistakes. Basically Los Angles would keep moving further down the road from Oakland with every few bills. At one point it was up to 650 miles (instead of maybe 390). I would call, they would fix the bills, and errors would go away. For a while. Then LA would start moving towards Mexico again. I suspect that if I never had called them LA would be in Central America by now. They where always very polite, and very good at apologizing, and always fixed the errors when asked, but the errors had to be deliberate. We eventually fixed the problem by not using the vendor any more. (Harder then it should have been - they were a reliable trucking company, other then their billing).

    Keep talking to your employer. Keep it polite, but do not stop following up. If you cannot fix things internally you can try filing a wage claim with your state's department of labor (assuming that they have one - not all states do). Alternatively, small claims court and talking to an attorney about a general court action are also possibilities.

    Just a thought, but if your employer is bent, this is probably not the only game they are running. Small visable problems are often symtoms of something much worse happening out of sight. Sometimes the only solution to a dishonest employer is to be somewhere else.

    One last thing. Paying overtime on the following paycheck is not necessary illegal as long as it does get paid no later then that. Back in the stone ages before computers payrolls were almost always guesses that were corrected the following pay period. What is referred to as "paying current". State pay day laws tend to be written to specifically allow this, even though the numbers of employers using that type of payment method is not large these days. But I have never heard of any state that legally allows corrections to lag past the next pay period. Even back in the 1950s when people were using hand crank calculators.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

    Comment


    • #3
      You can inform your boss that the error has still not been corrected & see what they say or you can file a wage claim with the Iowa Workforce Development.
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

      Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

      Comment


      • #4
        How are the off? Minutes or hours?

        Comment

        The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
        Working...
        X