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Question about Paid vacation Massachusetts

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  • Question about Paid vacation Massachusetts

    I just recently found out that my employer offers paid vacation to any fulltime workers after they've been employed for a year.
    now I never got a memo or was told in orientation,just heard it from a co worker.
    when i asked my bos he said yes i do qualify.I submitted my time off request sheet and it was approved for 1 week paid vacation.
    2 questions,why do you think my employer or anyone in hr didn't tell me about it?(seems like bad HR)
    and when exactly am i required to be given my vacation paycheck?

    thanks and any help is apreciated

  • #2
    No one here could have any possible idea why they didn't tell you. It could have been simply a clerical error.

    There is no law that says when you get your vacation check.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      if i don't get my vacation check the following week after my vacation,should I be concerned then?

      Comment


      • #4
        You can certainly inquire if you don't get it then.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          also I have yet to be offered health insurance
          is that legal?

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          • #6
            That depends.

            How many employees does your employer have and how many hours do you work regularly each week?

            Note to readers from other states: MA has laws about health insurance that do not exist in any other state except Hawaii. Do not assume that the answer would be the same for you.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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            • #7
              I don't know how many employees are employed,but there are 5 offices throughout the country if that helps.
              I work 40 hours a week every week

              Comment


              • #8
                Then yes, you should have been offered health insurance by now UNLESS there is a waiting period in the plan document that has not been fulfilled yet. That's unlikely though; such waiting periods are rarely longer than 90 days. By all means check with HR about it.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                Comment


                • #9
                  can they be in some legal trouble for not offering it?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Employers have to offer health ins. in Ma. for employees who regularly work 35 or more hrs. per week if the employer has 11 or more employees OR pay a tax to the state.
                    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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                    • #11
                      If they do not offer health insurance AT ALL, they will have to pay a tax/fine of $295 per employee to the state. Given the cost of health insurance, some employers feel that the tax/fine will cost less than the insurance and they are willing to make that choice.

                      If, however, they offer health insurance to their employees but did not offer it to you when you became eligible, that's a different story and yes, they could conceivably get into legal trouble for that.
                      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Talking about federal law only (which is applicable anywhere), employers do not have to offer employer provided health care, but if the employer chooses to do so, the employer becomes subject to a federal law called ERISA which requires that the employer have a formal published written plan. The employer failing to follow their plan rules is a big deal under ERISA. And under ERISA, the employer is required to show employees a copy of the Summary Plan Document if requested.

                        MA is mostly unique among the states in that (as discussed) there is an actual requirement that employers must offer employer provided health coverage (subject to penalties if non-compliance occurs).

                        It sometimes gets tricky when there are both federal and state laws in play to be sure exactly which set of laws any particular rules comes from.
                        "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
                        Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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