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shift differetial Texas

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  • shift differetial Texas

    I work in a nursing home in texas and i will be there for five years in april, recently they gave raises to all of the nursing staff, except me, they also raised the shift differetial from .50 to a 1.00, since I did not receive a raise I asked then I get the differetial and the assistant administrator (who is not licensed) said that NO i do not get the differetial of a 1.00. My question is can they do this or is there something I can do??

  • #2
    What was their reason for not giving one to you?

    BTW, the only time a raise is required by law is if minimum wage is raised by the appropriate legislative body and you are working under the new minimum. Shift differentials are never required by law.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      shift differetial

      They did not give me a reason, they keep telling me that I will get a raise and the differetial together, but they have a been telling me that for a month now. The rest of the nursing dept. have recevied raises 2 months ago.

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      • #4
        pay raises

        Do they half to give raises to employees on their yearly?? I will be working there five yrs on april 12 and was just wondering if that is what they are waiting on just frustrated....

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        • #5
          No. There are no circumstances whatsoever, with the sole exception of the reason in my first post, when they are required by law to give ANY employee a raise.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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