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CAN A Lower employee fire me... New York

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  • cbg
    replied
    I never said the employee couldn't confirm with the boss.

    What I said was that this is not a subject addressed by law. There is no law that tells an employer who they can and cannot delegate to do a firing. This is not a legal issue. This is an internal question only. I suspect that the legislature has bigger problems to worry about and is not going to waste their time passing laws to manage the boss's job for him.

    If you want to keep working until the boss tells you himself, that's up to you. However, that does NOT make it illegal for the boss to delegate the job to the office cat, if he so chooses.

    Leave a comment:

  • Pattymd
    Senior Member

  • Pattymd
    replied
    Have you confirmed directly with YOUR manager that you are, in fact, terminated?
    Let's see, this is what I said two days ago.

    Leave a comment:

  • cactus jack
    Senior Member

  • cactus jack
    replied
    Boss wants to fire me, he can do it himself. Some lower level schmuck ain't gonna get it done.

    Leave a comment:

  • Betty3
    Senior Member

  • Betty3
    replied
    As I said in my first post, we don't have much info. However, I would assume there was more to it than just the lower level employee saying, "You're fired" w/o any further instructions/information or w/o any follow-up by the boss or HR. The employee could also have asked his boss if what he was told was true.

    The lower level employee was probably given the authority delegated to him to do the firing.
    Betty3
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Betty3; 03-27-2009, 10:04 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • cactus jack
    Senior Member

  • cactus jack
    replied
    CBG, what does a person do then? Some guy on the lower end of the ladder tell you that the boss fired you. What then? Clock out and go home? And if the "messenger" lied? What then?

    Leave a comment:


  • cbg
    replied
    There is nothing in the law that says who can or cannot fire you. Anyone who has been delegated by the company to do so can. This is not a legal matter.

    Leave a comment:

  • cactus jack
    Senior Member

  • cactus jack
    replied
    Yeah, it can be done. But I also know that when I've seenit done it causes nothing but major trouble for the boss.

    Technically, you can ignore the person of lower authority. Because, well, they are of lower authority. If you take their word for it and leave, and then find out that they lied, what then? I say ignore them. Then, if you do get in trouble because you really was fired, you have a decent excuse.

    I cannot fathom WHO in their right mind would do that, but yes it can be done.

    Leave a comment:

  • Pattymd
    Senior Member

  • Pattymd
    replied
    Agree. If whoever has the authority delegates that authority downward, it may not be good management, but it isn't illegal.

    Have you confirmed directly with YOUR manager that you are, in fact, terminated?

    Leave a comment:

  • Betty3
    Senior Member

  • Betty3
    replied
    We don't have much info here but yes, it's legal for an employer/boss to tell another employee to let you know you are terminated. There is no law against it. (though it may not be the best way to handle a termination)

    (unless you happen to have a binding employment contract or CBA to the contrary)
    Betty3
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Betty3; 03-26-2009, 05:00 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • twoolson52
    Junior Member

  • twoolson52
    started a topic CAN A Lower employee fire me... New York

    CAN A Lower employee fire me... New York

    can my boss have another employee fire me when i am the manager shouldn't he have to do it...
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