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NOW WAHT?!?! mun. employee, pa Pennsylvania

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  • NOW WAHT?!?! mun. employee, pa Pennsylvania

    ive reached the end of my rope.

    i work for the local municipality in Pennsylvania (board of supervisors).

    on june 20 of 2008 we submitted a contract for the street department for the years 2009-2011. there were 3 meetings set up, but the supervisors never showed up. tomorrows 2009. the contract we are currently under was written in 1985, iirc. its a joke. anything that benefits us in it, and we dont have a contract, something benefits them, and they pull it out. we are trying to get this contract in place so we at least have an understanding of what is expected of us.

    it states in the old contract, one an employee is full time for 6 mth, they get put up to the highest wage earner, so everyone would get the same. we never did. now they are trying to take our comp time away, which they cant under the old contract.

    what can we do!?!?!?!!!?

    we are not union.

    im just SOOOOOOOOOO f$^%ing frustrated with this situation. we have no voice, imo, our collective bargaining rights are being denied.

    ive been told the state dept of labor can and will do NOTHING for us, since its a govt agency.

    federal dept of l&i?? lawyer?? and what kind of lawyer, if applicable? join afscme (we REALLY dont want to have to do that, but if thats what it takes....)

    we just want this straightened out. its bee long enough now.

  • #2
    Not knowing what procedures and regulations are in place in your municipality, nor how it is structured, it is impossible to tell you who you should go to or what you should do. If you feel your rights are being violated as far as collective bargaining are concerned you can contact the NLRB. If the powers that be just won't agree to your terms, you have much less recourse. You can join a union but bear in mind that isn't a guarantee that you will get the policies that you want implemented (telling you from first hand experience). The bargaining process is always give and take and it usually means giving up something you want for something you want more, no matter what side you are on. It may be your best alternative, but you also need to go into it with your eyes open and not view it just as a vehicle to get the things you want.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

    Comment


    • #3
      thats the problem, we have NO VOICE. we are brushed off, no one cares.

      we dont WANT ANYTHING, per se, we just want a list of "rules" to play by. this make it up as you go s#$t is no good.

      ive been in unions before, and ive never seen any good come of them, but if the union can exert some pressure on them to get them to acknowledge that we actually exist, it may be worth it??!?

      whats nlrb??

      Comment


      • #4
        National Labor Relations Board.

        Unfortunately there are no laws that require an employer to always play by the same rules. If you work for a municipality though, I'd be shocked if there weren't at least some guidelines, union or not. I'd be even more shocked if there wasn't a formal process for grievances or challenging practices. What and how that works in your municipality thouh, is hard to say as it can vary a lot. Is there an HR Department for the municipality? Board of Directors/Councilmen/Aldermen, etc? Have you read through the municipal regulations for your area? Start there.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

        Comment

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