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Michigan - Not informing employee of a change in schedule

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  • Michigan - Not informing employee of a change in schedule

    It seems after reading more on the boards that nothing illegal is happening here.

    What an unfair world.
    Last edited by b1ackcat; 10-30-2008, 04:42 PM.

  • #2
    Excuse me? What is not illegal?
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Sorry, I had a post on here about my girlfriends bosses abusing their scheduling power, but I read 3 or 4 cases on these forums of very similar situations and it was deemed legal.

      The only thing I still question is the fact that this manager sent out the weekly schedule, then Mid-week changed it, then fired someone who didn't show up for a shift on the new schedule (he had never even heard his shifts had changed, since no one called him). But I guess that's still covered under the "at-will" employment

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      • #4
        Just a question.

        If the manager has a habit of changing schedules around, why did the employee wait to be called instead of checking for himself?

        Just askin'.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          There's no way to tell when she's going to do it. She's done in 3 times in the 10 weeks that my girlfriend has worked there. And their phone doesn't even work, so the only way to find out is to have someone check for you or come in every day to make sure the schedule hasn't changed. it's terrible business practice

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          • #6
            You're right. It is a terrible business practice.

            Unfortunately, the law doesn't require that employer only use good business practices.

            Probably wouldn't be a bad idea to check on the schedule anyway, if he's going to fire people for not showing up.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

            Comment

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