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Salaried Exempt laws in NC North Carolina

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  • Salaried Exempt laws in NC North Carolina

    Hi. I am a manager at a manufacturing plant in NC. All of the salaried people are exempt from overtime pay. We are required to work 45 hours a week. I was making $45,000/yr, but we were just forced to take a 10% paycut, which brings me down to $40,500 year. Is it legal for the company to force me to work 45 hours a week without overtime pay because I make less than $50,000 yr?
    Thanks. This is a very imformative and useful sight!!

  • #2
    Originally posted by garman View Post
    Hi. I am a manager at a manufacturing plant in NC. All of the salaried people are exempt from overtime pay. We are required to work 45 hours a week. I was making $45,000/yr, but we were just forced to take a 10% paycut, which brings me down to $40,500 year. Is it legal for the company to force me to work 45 hours a week without overtime pay because I make less than $50,000 yr?
    Thanks. This is a very imformative and useful sight!!
    Yes. Legal.
    Please no private messages about your situation.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply!

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      • #4
        FYI. The federal rules are that Exempt Salaried employees must be paid at least $455/week. Hard as it is to believe, in the not so distant past, that was quite a bit lower.

        A very few states have a higher limit but NC is not normally mentioned as one of those states.
        "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
        Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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