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Washroom breaks - Ontario

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  • Washroom breaks - Ontario

    Are employers in the province of Ontario required to dock employees for the use of washrooms? Working in a call centre, whenever we leave our desks for a washroom break, we are docked this time from our paycheques. As well, they accumulate this time and hold it over our heads when our semi-annual raise times come into effect. Are they allowed to do this?

  • #2
    There are no responders here, so far as I know, that understand Canadian labor laws. Sorry.

    However, since y'all tend to be more labor friendly than we are, I suspect this is not a legal practice.

    The way US federal law works, any break of less than 20 minutes must be paid. If you are spending more than that each time you go to the restroom, you may want to see a doctor.

    I will attempt to lookup your federal and provincial laws. It could be enlightening.
    Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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    • #3
      docked pay

      Originally posted by workersrights111 View Post
      Are employers in the province of Ontario required to dock employees for the use of washrooms? Working in a call centre, whenever we leave our desks for a washroom break, we are docked this time from our paycheques. As well, they accumulate this time and hold it over our heads when our semi-annual raise times come into effect. Are they allowed to do this?
      I don't know about their laws, but if you did not punch out to go to the bathroom, I don't see how they could...

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      • #4
        This is some (& the only info) I have on breaks in Canada: Except for the federal jurisdiction of Canada and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, the employment standards legislation in all provinces and territories requires that employees receive a 30-min. break for each consecutive five hours worked. Legislation doesn't require additional breaks during the workday. Newfoundland and Labrador requires a one-hour break following five consecutive hours of work.
        ref. Ontario: Employment Standards Act 2000.
        An employee must not work for more than five hours in a row without getting a 30-minute eating period (meal break) free from work. The law does not require an employer to provide any breaks in addition to this eating period. However, if the employer does provide another type of a break, such as a coffee break, and the employee must remain at his or her workplace during the break, the employee must be paid at least the minimum wage for that time.


        I realize this thread is a couple of weeks old but thought I would go ahead & post info (for reference/interest) since another poster recently posted.
        Last edited by Betty3; 06-10-2008, 09:18 PM.
        Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

        Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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        • #5
          ?

          Originally posted by workersrights111 View Post
          Are employers in the province of Ontario required to dock employees for the use of washrooms? Working in a call centre, whenever we leave our desks for a washroom break, we are docked this time from our paycheques. As well, they accumulate this time and hold it over our heads when our semi-annual raise times come into effect. Are they allowed to do this?
          They want you to squat and use a big coffee can.......just walk off and go to the bathroom or yell I have to go number 1.................

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          • #6
            And this is helpful to the poster how, Silkwood?
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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            • #7
              cbg

              Originally posted by cbg View Post
              And this is helpful to the poster how, Silkwood?
              don't sit and pee in your pants..........

              Comment

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