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Leaving the company During Jury Duty

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  • Leaving the company During Jury Duty

    Hello All,

    I am currently doing jury duty for a 30-day trial. My employer compensates for my Jury duty. Prior to my Jury duty, I wanted to put in my two-weeks. Since my employer pays for Jury Duty I wanted to wait until after I complete my service. I predicted that my trial would be a maximum one-week long. Unfortunately, the trial is 30-days long. I was wondering if I could put in my two-weeks during Jury Duty. I am concerned about being sued for putting in my two-weeks during jury duty. Also, I can't put in my two-weeks after Jury Duty because I have a five-week vacation planned in May. Does anybody know if this will be a problem? Please let me know. Please give me some advise on what I should do. Thank you.

  • #2
    Employers are not allowed to penalize you for performing jury duty. Unless you have an employment contract stating otherwise, you are an at-will employee, which means that you can leave at any time. It also means you can be fired at any time for any reason not prohibited by law, so the employer could choose to accept your notice as soon as you give it. This really isn't a legal issue yet. It's a matter of you deciding how you want to handle things.

    Do you have five weeks of paid vacation accrued that you plan to use for the vacation? You didn't indicate what state you're in. If you post that, someone can tell you whether your state requires payout of unused accrued vacation upon termination.
    I am not able to respond to private messages. Thanks!

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