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No rest between shifts!! Illinois

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  • No rest between shifts!! Illinois

    I worked for a company for a few years now. There is plenty of overtime and it's kind of expected of employees to work that over time. Working weekends is optional (to a point) and I have chosen to work 7 days a week for the last few months.

    The work day is 2pm-midnight. 10pm-12am is pretty much optional. Depending in the area you work in.

    Tonight, I was basically forced to work until midnight tonight under threat of negative repercussions. And my shift on Saturday is at 5am. It's never been with me leaving at 10pm on a Friday in the past.

    To top it off, my work partner wasn't even spoken to about his leaving at 10pm. But, I received an earful. And a replacement for my partner was given.

    I was frightened about what my supervisor may do. He's known to lie to higher ups which result in negative reviews. He's also known to have several complaints from female workers (mostly temps) including myself.

    Taking out my commute time, I am left with 3.5 hours to sleep. 12am leaving work and 5am arriving again is not enough time for sufficient rest for a full 8 hour shift, is it?

    Is there a law about minimal amount of rest between shifts?

    Or am I to just be bullied into working until whenever my supervisor sees fit that I am free to go home??

  • #2
    I agree it isn't enough time for sleep, but except for very limited types of jobs involving public safety, such as airline pilots, interstate truckers, in some states nurses, there is no law requiring a minimum time off between shifts. Sorry.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Il. does have a one day rest in seven act:
      The One Day Rest in Seven Act, as its name implies, allows for at least 24 hours of rest in every calendar week. A calendar week is defined as seven consecutive 24 hour periods starting at 12:01 a.m. Sunday morning and ending at midnight the following Saturday. Under this Act, employers may ask IDOL for a relaxation of this requirement. If IDOL grants a relaxation, it requires a statement from the employer demonstrating that all employees who will be working seven days in a row are in fact volunteers.
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

      Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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      • #4
        Is my face

        Having said that, though, it's only 24 consecutive hours off in a workweek. Depending on how the work hours are scheduled, it's possible for the OP to be required to work the schedule s/he specifically mentioned without violating this provision.
        Last edited by Pattymd; 03-17-2008, 04:33 AM.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          I agree but I just thought it would be a good idea to mention it.
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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