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Pay for Filling out forms Maryland

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  • Pay for Filling out forms Maryland

    I was hired by a company and was given a start date of 5/21/07. A few days prior to my official start date, I was told that I needed to come into the office and fill out a slew of human resources forms (direct deposit, 401k, tax forms, etc). I also had to wait to meet with the president and take ID pictures. I was in the office for a few hours. I was hired as an hourly worker. I was not paid for this time. I am thinking of leaving my job and was wondering if they owe me for the hours that I spent in the office that day.

  • #2
    http://www.dllr.state.md.us/labor/essclaimform.htm

    I'm not sure, however, whether the claim will be accepted. For some reason, I'm thinking the claim must be made within 3-6 months, but ElleMD will know when she gets here. It may actually be too late to file with the DLLR.

    However, could the forms have been provided to you for completion at home? Were you required to go to the office and complete the forms there? Generally speaking, this is not compensable time; it's merely pre-employment activity.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      I was required to come into the office, which was an hour outside of where I lived. (The head office is different than my working office).

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      • #4
        Why did you wait until now? As you can see from the claim instructions, you are required to try to work this out with the employer before you can file the claim anyway.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          As signing up for benefits and the like was not for the good of your employer, but for your own benefit, it is extremely unlikely that the time would have to be paid. The fact that you had to come to the office to get those is incidental to the purpose.

          The statute of limitations is actually 3 years and 2 weeks from the date the money was due. The 60 day rule applies to filing an appeal.
          I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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          • #6
            I'm also curious as to why you waited to address this until you were thinking of leaving.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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            • #7
              Well, I can't think of a better way to start off a new job then by filing a wage claim against my new employer. Just imagine the warm reception that would get.

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              • #8
                Who said anything about filing a wage claim immediately? But it doesn't sound as if the poster even so much as asked the employer about it.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cbg View Post
                  But it doesn't sound as if the poster even so much as asked the employer about it.
                  And the instructions in Maryland say that the employee MUST pursue the claim with the employer first.
                  I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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