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idle time at work Ohio

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  • idle time at work Ohio

    How do I handle a situation where I am not tasked with enough hours to fill my day? I am an exempt employee and have notified my supervisor on numerous occasions that I do not have enough work to fill an 8 hour day, let alone a 40 hour week. As anyone in my position would do I fill my time to the best of my ability within the rules. If I complete all of my assigned tasks to his satisfaction and he cannot find more work for me to do how do I deal with that?

    Also, if I am salaried am I being paid to complete the tasks assigned to me and outlined in my job description or am I being paid for that + my time (40 hrs. a week)?

    How does living in an at will state affect this situation? Even if I am a good employee who completes all assigned tasks could I conceivably be fired if someone decided there was a reason to fire me for not filling my time with non-existent work?

  • #2
    There's no law that says that an employer has to give employees enough work to fill the day. If you are an exempt employee, you are being paid to complete the task at hand however many hours it takes (and it could be more than eight in any given day). Exempt does not equal salaried. Salaried is a payment method. Whether you are exempt or not depends on the time of work you do as defined in the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    In at will employment situation, you can be fired for any reason that is not specifically prohibited by law.
    I am not able to respond to private messages. Thanks!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ohioemployee23 View Post
      could I conceivably be fired if someone decided there was a reason to fire me for not filling my time with non-existent work?
      They don't need that much of a reason to fire you, if they wanted to, but it probably would not make sense to do so.

      Let's say your predecessor was good, but barely got the work done each week. You are much better and get all of the work done with room to spare, for the same cost. The company would be nuts to fire you since it will be gambling that your replacement could do the job as well for that price.

      You can ask for extra work. There is always something to do, even if it is exploring areas that the company did not have time to explore before, such as new technology that could make the company more efficient in one or more of its business processes or reviewing policies to see if they might need to be revised or whatever. The company might not have something in mind, but if you see something that you think might interest them, suggest it. Voila! New project that does not necessarily have a deadline attached to it.

      Don't assume that simply because your assigned tasks have been completed and you have idle time that you can engage in personal pursuits (web surfing or, worse, leaving the office) unless and until you have been given permission to do so.
      Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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