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  • California

    Beginning January 1, California has changed their labor laws for Exempt employees as it relates to over time. I need to know what the new regulations are. or where I can find them? input/help?
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  • #2
    The only change I know of is automatic, i.e., the weekly minimum salary changes when the minimum wage increases. Therefore, the minimum weekly salary for exempt employees is now $640 (twice the minimum wage X 40 hours).
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Agreed. If CA has any other changes effecting Exempt employees effective January 1st, they are keeping them very quiet. If such changes had occured, I would have expected to find them here.

      http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_OvertimeExemptions.htm
      "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
      Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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      • #4
        California

        Thank you both for your reply. At the risk of sounding ignorant, does this include overtime? That seems to be the center of information I've been asked to find out? The laws for overtime for exempt employees. I do appreciate your help.

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        • #5
          What does overtime have to do with exempt employees? Nothing. "Exempt" means exempt from the overtime provisions of the law.
          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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          • #6
            If you are an exempt employee, you do not get overtime in any state.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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            • #7
              California

              Please do not shoot the messenger. I was given a specific question to answer/research. It was

              Beginning January 1, California has changed their labor laws for Exempt employees as it relates to over time. I need to know what the new regulations are.
              --

              Thank you for your input.

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              • #8
                And the answer is, there ain't no such thing.
                I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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                • #9
                  The answer is, there is no law in California beginning January 1 or any other date that changes the laws on overtime for all exempt employees.

                  IF AND ONLY IF you are exempt under the Computer Professional exemption AND are paid hourly, the rate at which you become exempt from overtime has been changed from $41 to $36.

                  This represents the sum total of changes to California law as affects exempt employees or overtime provision.
                  The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rah1 View Post
                    Beginning January 1, California has changed their labor laws for Exempt employees as it relates to over time. I need to know what the new regulations are.
                    Is there an actual source where someone is getting this from? It might be easier to answer your question if we could reference that source.
                    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
                    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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