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Non-Profit workplace harrassment Texas

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  • Non-Profit workplace harrassment Texas

    I work for a non-profit. Have been experiencing harrassment (passive/aggressive) from the business administrator. The latest problem is that the business administrator shared my compensation by way of comparison with a co-worker who in turn shared this information with one of my clients. Has the business administrator crossed a legal line?

  • #2
    Probably not. Salary information is not legally confidential per se. An employer could choose to post salary information on their website, or on a freeway advertising board for that matter. I personnaly like the idea of salary information being public because it helps stop very stupid decisions that need the dark of night to florish from occuring. And the NLRA law specifically says that employees are legally allowed to discuss with each other. And employers can (probably) legally prevent employees from making someone else's salary information available. This is not an externally imposed requirement, but many employers will (legally) fire Payroll or Human Resources employees who talk out of school. There is a chance that your manager violated an internal company rule. I have worked for employers who would have legally fired me if I had told clients what my staff were paid. This however would have been because of violation of a company policy, not because of an external legal requirement.

    Having said that, while not all discriminatory actions are illegal, it is possible that an action that would be legal on it's face could be illegal if done in an illegally discriminatory fashion. For example, if the employer made salary information for women employees only public, that could be a Title VII violation. On the other hand (for example), if the employer were to only make the salary information public of those employees who are Dallas Cowboys fans, this action would be legal, because Dallas Cowboys fans are not a legally protected class.

    Illegal discrimination is a function of discriminated against someone because they are a member of a protected class.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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    • #3
      Although I agree it was unprofessional to be sharing salary information, it was not illegal. Neither is "passive/agressive" behavior illegal. Unless you are experiencing "harrassment" due to a protected characteristic, such as your race, age, gender, ethnicity, etc., or because, for example, you reported a violation of law to the regulatory authority, it is not illegal harrassment.
      I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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      • #4
        Jinx, DAW. Happy Holidays!
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          Pet Peeve Alert!

          Also "passive/aggressive" behavior is very subjective. It is always something we think the other person is doing. I am fairly sure there has never been a single time in the entire history of the world that someone thinks that they personally are behaving in a "passive/aggressive" manner. It is always that other person who fails to see that we are right, and fails to do what we want, when we want it.
          "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
          Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

          Comment

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