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Wage Reduction Nevada

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  • Wage Reduction Nevada

    I am a salaried employee (manager) that has approximately 60+ employees that report to me daily. Due to unforseen decrease in buisness, my employer has required me to give up 20% of my salary. I had to sign a "wage adjustment form" stating this. On that form it did say that I would recieve one additional day off for compensation of the reduction and it would be temporary. I am still working 50+ hours per week in that four day period and some weeks I have still worked 5 physical days. Is this lawful? Do I have any recourse?

  • #2
    Salaried Exempt employees still need to be paid $455/week or more under the federal rules. If your employer takes your normal salary below that, then you are no longer Exempt. Non-Exempt Salaried employee must be paid at least minimum wage. And generally speaking, while absent a contract or CBA, employers can legally change conditions of employment on a go forward basis. Some states have notification requirements, but the form you signed would almost certainly meet the notification requirements.

    The only odd thing is the extra day off. I can think of no good reason for them to put it in there. They are possible acting like (maybe) they are trying to use the docking rules in 29 CFR 541.602, which if true, is just plain stupid, because you are working the time, and even if you were not, the absence would not be voluntary.

    They had you sign what quite possibly be a legally enforcable contract (with a "something" for "something" exchange spelled out), and this is something that maybe, possibly, could come back to bite your employer. What you need to is see a local attorney who knows something about labor laws in your state and have them read that document plus any other documents that you have.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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