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Mandatory Meetings - Virginia

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  • Mandatory Meetings - Virginia

    My boss (the owner) at a small computer store has set a mandatory meeting for us today at 4:30. He did not inform us of it at all, but told the assistant manager to tell us about it yesterday. It is also not paid. I'm not doing anything in particular, but I live a long way from my job, and it's my day off, and I put in my 2 weeks yesterday; so I don't think the meeting concerns me too much.

    My question is, if I do not show up, would the fact that it's not paid also make it not mandatory? And what type of notice does the employer need to give you before expecting you to show up on your day off?

    I'm a part time employee by the way.

  • #2
    Originally posted by lukel99 View Post
    And what type of notice does the employer need to give you before expecting you to show up on your day off?
    None legally required. The boss could call you at home and tell you to come in and expect you to be there after your normal commute time.

    If the meeting is mandatory, the employer is legally required to pay you for your time.

    Being part-time, full-time, temporary, or seasonal employee has absolutely no bearing on whether or not the employer can expect you to be present.

    Don't go at your risk. You may find that by not showing up, your two week's notice will be shortened considerably.
    Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the reply.

      So, since it is unpaid, he could not fire me for not being there? I might show up, I'm just sick of his unprofessional behavior. I've been there for about 4 months and he keeps telling me if I stay for just a little longer, that I'll get more hours, but it never happens. I told him 2 days ago in no uncertain terms that I was going to need more hours; he told me that we'd talk about it yesterday, but like I already mentioned, he didn't show up. I called him during work and again after, but got his voicemail, and told him that I was waiting to finish our discussion, and he sent me a txt message saying we'd talk about it later.

      Finally, I called him back, got his voicemail again; and told him that I was going to have to put in my 2 week notice. Things of that nature happen all the time, he never keeps his appointments but expects us to. I don't want to go, and he's not even paying me enough for the gas to get out there.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lukel99 View Post
        So, since it is unpaid, he could not fire me for not being there?
        You are in an at-will state and he could fire you for any reason or no reason at all unless you are protected by a contract or collective bargaining agreement.

        He is requiring you to be at a meeting. You no-show, he could fire you. The unemployment folks would be inclined to side with him, but he would have great difficulty explaining not paying for attendance at a mandatory meeting. His choices then would be to pay those who attended OR say that it was not mandatory and no one needs to be paid (which would take the wind out of sails about firing you for not showing up).

        Why work for a person like that? He is stringing you along, not giving you answers, not planning on meeting the requirements of employment law -- you are better off going elsewhere.
        Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

        Comment

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