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Moral Issues Pennsylvania

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  • Moral Issues Pennsylvania

    Is it Legal for an employer to force you to do things that are morally wrong? and if you quit are you eligible for unemployement due to unsuitable work environment?

    Thank you

  • #2
    The short answer is, it depends.

    If you are a bartender and become Muslim and, therefore, can no longer serve alcohol, you could be terminated.

    Is the moralistic issue a legal one as well?
    Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

    I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

    Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

    Comment


    • #3
      the company was collecting items for a charitable organization and he would come into my store and remove phones that were in good condition and expect me to sell them, I confronted him about it and he told me If I didnt like it I could find a new job.

      he also asked me to file fraudulent mileage forms to justify the travel expense he paid me for the year.

      there are many more but these are the two main issues.

      Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by steelrzs1 View Post
        the company was collecting items for a charitable organization and he would come into my store and remove phones that were in good condition and expect me to sell them, I confronted him about it and he told me If I didnt like it I could find a new job.

        he also asked me to file fraudulent mileage forms to justify the travel expense he paid me for the year.

        there are many more but these are the two main issues.

        Thanks
        As far as forcing someone to do somethiming morally wrong...that can be in the eye of the beholder. In any case, the employee is free to leave the employ of that employer.

        I would advise an employee to not do something illegal, even if the employee insists. I am more than willing to be fired for not breaking the law.

        Regarding the unemployment issue, I represented a man who quit his job for moral reasons and perhaps legal reasons. He worked at a store that sold drug paraphernalia. The police came into the store one night and questioned him about the sales of drug paraphernalia. There were no arrests because the police were not certain a law had been broken, but they made it clear that they did not want the store to sell the paraphernalia anymore.

        The man was under stress because of the moral issue of selling drug paraphernalia and the harassment of the police. Therefore, he quit the job. Of course, the employer challenged his unemployment compensation claim.

        We had a hearing and we won. The Labor Dept. agreed that it was reasonable for him to quit his under those conditions. He was awarded his unemployment benefits.

        I hope this helps.

        Good luck!
        In Solidarity,

        Wayne

        www.waynemarshall.org

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by steelrzs1 View Post
          he also asked me to file fraudulent mileage forms to justify the travel expense he paid me for the year.
          Thanks
          Did he withhold taxes on the travel expenses? DO you travel on business? Did the amounts vary, or was it more like an "auto allowance"?
          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

          Comment


          • #6
            he did not withhold any taxes and I did travel from store to store to deliver merch and to supervise the locations as an area manager.

            The employer did not contest the unemployement I will be fighting the UE Review Board on this He is not going to be at the hearing.

            Thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              Well, then, that's a violation of IRS regulations. Reimbursement of business-related expenses that are not properly documented (i.e., he had you lie on the records) makes the reimbursement taxable.

              Irrespective of that, it's probably too late for that now.

              I imagine your initial claim was denied because you voluntarily chose to quit?
              I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, I was denied benefits due to 402b voluntary quit, I thought that I was entitled to a little more protection due to the circumstances, I really need to win this hearing so I need to go in as prepared as possible. any more advice would be appreciated.

                Thank you

                Comment


                • #9
                  Have you already had a hearing before a Referee or have you just appealed the Notice of Determination and awaiting your hearing before a Referee?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I appealed the notice of determination and I am awaiting my appeal hearing

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by steelrzs1 View Post
                      I appealed the notice of determination and I am awaiting my appeal hearing
                      So, how can you be sure your employer will not actively contest your claim by attending the hearing?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rjc View Post
                        So, how can you be sure your employer will not actively contest your claim by attending the hearing?
                        I am still in contact with employee's from the company and he did not even pick up the notice from the store and he has told the GM he will not contest it.

                        Comment

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